The Third Eye: Unleashing Creative Inspiration

Česky: Ajna. English: Ajna chakra also bears t...
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Many spiritual traditions teach the existence of an invisible third eye, which functions as a gateway to higher realms of consciousness. It’s believed that this third eye allows us to experience visions and other mystical phenomenon. According to this belief, although each of us is born with an inner – or spiritual – eye, we must learn to open it throughout the course of our lives.

As an academic and an educator, I’m naturally skeptical of supernatural claims.  But as I experience new things in life, I have become increasingly convinced that a core of truth lies behind this belief. Call it the third eye, the ajna chakra, clairvoyance, the sixth sense or whatever you may. The fact remains that a connection does exist between our waking, conscious mind and some greater level of consciousness.

3rd Eye Vision

In my own life there have been instances that vividly illustrate this reality.  One afternoon, while daydreaming at my desk,  I saw myself enter a large, empty theater.  The next day I was invited on a surprise excursion, and this very circumstance occurred. There was also the time that I played roulette at my university’s “casino night.”  To my surprise I knew the winning numbers before they were called.  Most of us have had experiences similar to these.  They are those rare and unexplainable moments which we never forget.

As an artist and a writer, I’ve also experienced flashes of profound inspiration. Many of my best ideas appeared instantaneously from nowhere. I’ve always suspected that these ideas originated within my subconscious, or were introduced by a higher power.

But I’ve also undergone lengthy dry spells during which fresh ideas were slow in coming. Reflecting on these stretches of time, I’ve wondered why my creativity stopped flowing. In retrospect, I can see that these were periods during which I was not receptive to inspiration. There was simply too much noise in my life.

Re-framing this in mystical terminology, it is possible that during these dry spells my third eye was closed. The connection that brings ideas forward to my conscience mind wasn’t functioning.  Overburdened by the cares of this world, I was distracted and unreceptive.

Enjoy the Silence

So how do we open ourselves to inspiration? Some Eastern religions have developed rigorous methods of training to open the third eye. Through my own studies, I have identified two practices which keep me receptive to creative inspiration.

The first practice is to seek out and embrace silence. So much of our lives is blanketed in a fog of noise. Wherever we go we are exposed to the sounds of chatter, music and television. Many of us are uncomfortable with silence, and purposely surround ourselves with noise.

Yet it is in those rare moments of quiet stillness that we are most receptive.  A trusted friend spent over a year living as a monk on Mount Athos. During that time he studied with several renowned spiritual masters, each of whom emphasized the value of silence. The pollution of noise, they taught him, needs time to work it’s way out of your consciousness. They advised that for every minute spent listening to music or watching television, an equal amount of time should be spent in silence.  While that may not be practical for most of us, setting aside time for silence each day can make a profound difference in our lives.

The Power of Now

The second practice is to remain in the present moment. Our minds are constantly worrying about the future, or dwelling on the past. Stop and ask yourself this question: how much time do you actually spend thinking about the present moment?

The sad reality is that much of our lives slip past us.  Because we exist in a state of ceaseless distraction, we miss many opportunities for growth. And very often the best ideas present themselves right now, in the present.

Placing yourself in the present moment – and learning to stay there consistently – will open new levels of awareness within yourself. There are many techniques to accomplish this, including some forms of meditation and centering prayer.  One way to begin is by reading a modern spiritual classic: The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle. This book has transformed many lives, including my own.

By adopting these two practices, you will create a new level of receptiveness within yourself. In other words, you are providing the conditions necessary for the third eye to open. In doing so, you will unleash powers of creative inspiration which are otherwise inaccessible. And when this occurs, you will cross new thresholds as both an artist and as a human being.

For more thoughts on writing and spirituality, you may also enjoy Fantasy Writing and the Spiritual Quest.

Antonio del Drago is a writer, philosopher and professor. His latest book, The Mythic Guide to Characters: Writing Characters Who Enchant and Inspire, is now available.

15 Responses to The Third Eye: Unleashing Creative Inspiration

  1. well thank you for your advice i promise ill take that and i know it will help me in my life please tell me more that i need to know because i plan on using it later on in life by the way i’m only thirteen years old just to let you know 

  2. Antonio,
    I too have had similar experiences, and as you have said yourself; many of us have. 

    Writing is my outlet and the only thing I have been passionate about for as long as I can remember.
    I tend to find that when I have been up for many hours, on the winding down, when I am alone; that I write the best.
    I literally mean, a constant flow of thought and emotion writing itself freely without any constraint. 
    I don’t know why – but it is amazing.
    The thoughts pour out of nowhere almost, and they’re creative, unique and overwhelming.
    Like you, I tend to have ideas, pop into my head at random times; sentences that I could use in stories or various personal writings. 
    I make sure I always have my phone near me to ensure I jot them down, in fear that they may escape me :)

    I have enjoyed reading your piece of Unleashing Creative Inspiration.
    This year I was feeling so lost in life – direction wise… I have been looking to find myself. As it turned out, I met someone who made me realise things, that in part, I already knew myself. But it was a different approach, a different way of looking at things – exploring things. I realised that because I knew how big my imagination has always been, since a child, I became so narrow minded to limit my actual thoughts so as to not, NOT be accepted – to fit in and conform to society. Now I realise, I want more, to experience and discover more. I am still looking for that spiritual awakening, I think it will be the ultimate.

    Sarah.

  3. I have found a great method to begin my daily meditations,focus on the flash of a camera, then close your eyes and follpw the iimage INTO YOURSELF . W / practice you can “reset” your mood or present day outlook into a positive and limitless experience!

  4. Excellent! Antonio, what is the best way to keep myself centered every day. Through meditation only, or can I be doing more?

    • Hi Teresa,

      Meditation is always the best way.  But if you can, find some time to spend in quiet throughout the day.  This isn’t always possible, but it makes a tremendous difference.  If you can connect with nature during your quiet time, that’s even better!

  5. what if the third eye is the whole body it’s self and when you focused your mind you can now achieve the third eye.

  6. I use guided meditation myself, but usually not for writing inspiration.  For that I have night time dreams, walking is good (moving meditation).  I’m also a huge fan of noise.  I know quiet is traditional, but music creates landscapes in my head.  Plus, I grew up in a chaotic household.  I do best with at least some ambient hum (the two dogs and parrot can do it, but sometimes I need music or a TV show on on top) or I go nuts.

  7. I’m not skeptical of supernatural claims. Like M.R. James I had a peculiar experience when I was young. It didn’t feed my belief in the supernatural, however. Just the opposite: I put it down to a spasm in my brain. It made me wonder though, enough to think that I don’t know everything and probably shouldn’t expect to.

    I’ve never had visions or stepped out of the parameters of conventional reality, but I see no reason to scoff at such notions. We live in a strange old universe. I’m just hoping that when I die the punchline is revealed.