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Book Charming Interview

ThinkerX

Myth Weaver
This is one of several book promotion interviews I have done since joining 'Authors In Focus.' Not sure if they'll do any good, but it's something.

'Book Charming' bills itself as India's largest book blog. The person who runs it, Aakankshka Jain, has expressed interest in reviewing 'Empire: Country' - which despite being Book 2, seems more popular than the first book in the 'Empire' series.

The interview includes a photo of my not-so-photogenic self. Hopefully, viewing it won't inflict lasting damage.

Anyhow:

Interview with Tim Goff
 

pmmg

Vala
Nice interview, and though I am not there, I appreciate the plugs for the members here.

Why did you want to write a series about the nation after war? Why did that appeal to you?
 

ThinkerX

Myth Weaver
Nice interview, and though I am not there, I appreciate the plugs for the members here.

Why did you want to write a series about the nation after war? Why did that appeal to you?
Thank you. The 'interview' was me filling out a questionnaire.

As to the 'after the war' setting, that was me being a bit contrary.

The vast majority of epic fantasy series deal with the buildup and/or course of a grand conflict, be it against a Dark Lord, or between rival nations, or trouble on the frontiers. To me that seemed overdone.

So, I thought, what about an epic tale set in some other circumstance - a realm at peace - except there's problems. And where did those problems stem from? Winning the war.

My inspiration for that, such as it was, came from the end of the Cold War between the US and USSR. (Mods, this is a historical accounting, so don't get excited.) That played havoc in the US and elsewhere, economically and politically. A major portion of the economy was based on the Cold War *not* ending. Then it did.

Transfer that to a fantasy setting.

The Traag War was a decades long nightmare. Entire generations grew up knowing they'd be pressed into some form of service. A huge section of the imperial economy existed solely because of the war effort. Thieves and criminals were rounded up and pressed into service as saboteurs and assassins. Anybody who showed significant magical ability got packed off to Mystic Mountain. And then, one day, the war was simply over. Most of that wartime effort was over.

What is left are a great many people grappling with a nation and personal circumstances they no longer recognize - the sort of conditions that lead to social change. Then toss in some Lovecraftian abominations.
 

pmmg

Vala
I am sure you have it handeled. It seems the period after WWII had a lot of disaffected soldiers more so than the cold war. But any period has plenty of problems. I was wondering if you were a vet and wanted to say something about the way you experienced things during and after service.

I am not sure what America would look like if we had Eldrich things to contend with. I would think that would give the warriors something to still contend with.

I am deep into writing mode, but I plan to read at least some of it before I am done. I have Eve of Snows waiting, but ive been avoiding getting into anything that would take my energy away. Sadly, my company wants me to certify in some stuff, so.... its gonna be hard to switch gears.
 

ThinkerX

Myth Weaver
No, not a vet, just raised in the Cold War era. I have to emphasize that for a great many people, the end of the Cold War was literally unthinkable. I did run some numbers in the early 80's that told me it couldn't last...but those were so at odds with *everything* else I didn't really believe them.

Best as I can remember straight off, two 'Name' authors did have major stories set in the aftermath of a long devastating war. The first was Andre Norton - much of her 'Witch World' series is set after the Kolder war, and some of those episodes are absolutely brutal. The other was Glen Cook with his Garret series, chronicling the adventures of a private investigator with a number of cases revolving around the consequences of victory.

As to Eldritch Things...well, Traag was literally ruled by such entities. People in the Empire believed the demons and eldritch abominations were utterly crushed after the war. Said abominations, though, had other ideas. Most of their activities are covert...except when they are not.

As to 'Eve of Snows,' that is a fun, if complex read.
 
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