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Dragon's Egg RPG - Gods

Discussion in 'Dragon's Egg RPG' started by Steerpike, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    Choice of a god is optional in this game. If a god is chosen it may be simply for roleplaying or flavor purposes, or the choice may have a mechanical effect on the game. The latter takes place only for the most devout of characters (clerics or otherwise).

    For the gods below, I have provided basic information, including alignment (which should be within a step of the worshipper's alignment). Characters who wish to receive the "boon" provided to devout characters must observe the pertinent ceremony of their god, and must limit their behavior or actions according to the taboos of the god. Further, the worshipper must behave in an all-around devout manner, consistent with the concerns of the god, the god's provinces or domains and so on. Players who say their character is devout but do not act in a devout manner will not acquire the boon, and may suffer negative effects. These are not meant to be game-changing boons or effects, but provide an added layer for those who want them.

    For those who wish to have their faith in a god play a role in the game, I have provided below the gods of the Elven pantheon. These are generally worshipped only by elves and half-elves. The human pantheon will be provided shortly, and those gods tend to be worshipped by humans, though some half-elves choose to align themselves with the human pantheon as well.

    Elven Pantheon

    Oercus (Master of the Forest)

    Oercus' domain covers forests, hunting, and elven homes. His symbols are the bow, the leaf, the unicorn, and white topaz. Of all the elven deities, he dislikes other races the most and encourages his followers to fight their transgressions. Worshippers of Oercus often use white topaz gems implanted in the heart of a bow or in the pommel of a sword. Oercus is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: At the solstice, sacrifices in emeralds or non-innocent, non-elven lives are required.
    • Taboo: Fire cannot be used to harm a living forest.
    • Boon: Worshippers using a bow or sword with a white topaz implanted in the wood or pommel receive a +2 to hit with these weapons.


    * *

    Cedrus (Lord of Light)

    Cedrus is a god of growth and wealth. His clerics often act as farmers, tending orchards and growth of foods in the forests. His domain covers all plant growth, as well as seeds, their planting, and successful sprouting. His symbols are the sun, the diamond, Blackthorn, and the yellow-orange sun stone. He is considered chaotic good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: A great sacrifice or offering is made to Cedrus on high noon on the solstice.
    • Taboo: Worshippers do not eat seeds of any kind.
    • Boon: All worshippers of Cedrus can tap into life energy to turn undead
    .

    * *

    Agapanthus (Goddess of the Moon)

    Agapanthus' province is the night and darkness. She prizes opals, and her followers seek to confiscate these stones wherever they are found, so that they may be presented to her in her temple. Her symbols are the moon, black flowers, and a blue-white opal. She is considered neutral evil.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Living sacrifices are made to the goddess at every full moon.
    • Taboo: Worshippers can never bring light to her altars.
    • Boon: Worshippers gain a +2 when using ranged weapons between sunset and sunrise.


    * *

    Betula (Divine Master of Combat)

    Betula demands that worshippers practice their weapon skills. He encourages specialization in the sword. His province encompasses storms, war, luck, and combat. His symbols are the long sword, an elven helm, a lightning bolt, and green tourmaline. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers give all of their income to Betula's temple until they reach second level. Thereafter, they maintain a healthy rate of donation.
    • Taboo: Worshippers must pit themselves, in single combat, against a deadly opponent at least once per year.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +4 bonus to saves against Fear and Paralysis magics.


    * *

    Laurus (Mistress of the Night)

    Elves believe the goddess Laurus is the patron and protector of evil dragons. Her domain includes all night creatures and the night itself. Her symbols are a scimitar, darkness, and a black pearl. She is considered chaotic evil.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Magical beasts are sacrificed to Laurus at the new moon.
    • Taboo: Apart from the ceremony, worshipper cannot capture or attack magical beasts unless attacked first.
    • Boon: Worshippers learn the ancient tongue spoken by evil dragons.


    * *

    Acer (Deity of Making)

    Acer's worshippers value building, particularly creation with wood. His temples are often enormous hollowed-out trees filled with the sounds of sawing and hammering as his clerics go about their work. His provinces include building, engineering, and growing. His symbols are the carpenter's hammer, the forester's axe, and the green garnet. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Once per year, worshippers must begin a new building project.
    • Taboo: Worshippers cannot take part in the destruction of wooden structures.
    • Boon: Worshippers gain a +3 to damage against constructs.


    * *

    Digitalis (Deity of Unmaking)

    Digitalis has no temples. Her worshippers erect shrines of poisonous flowers around a chalice holding peridot gems. Her provinces are those of destruction, death, and chaos. Her symbols are a red and black chalice, and a black peridot amulet. She is considered Lawful Evil.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: On the first freezing night of the year, worshippers make a sacrifice using heat-generating magic.
    • Taboo: Worshippers may not grow anything.
    • Boon: Worshippers gain a +4 to saves against poisons and a +2 to hit against undead.


    * *

    Fraxinus (The Star Archer)

    Fraxinus is the good of the hunt, and of excess. His provinces include hunting, the bow, ranged warfare, and excessive drinking. His symbols include the elven long bow, an arrow, and the gold star sapphire. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers sacrifice a deer to Fraxinus at the solstice.
    • Taboo: Worshippers must use a bow to hunt for the majority of their food.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +1 to hit with bows. Each arrow blessed and dedicated to Fraxinus by one of his Clerics does +2 damage.


    * *

    Nephthytis (The Divine Poisoner)

    This goddess is worshipped by many assassins and thieves. Her Clerics have a habit of serving drugged food and wine to their guests, though not so drugged as to kill them. Her provinces are death and poison. Her symbols are the mushroom cap, dust, an elven eye drawn in dark colors, and the black star sapphire. She is considered lawful evil.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers create poisons during the new moon.
    • Taboo: Worshippers may not receive magical healing.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +4 bonus to saves against poisons. If successful, there is a 50% chance the poison will heal the worshipper.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2012
  2. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    Human Pantheon

    NOTE: The Norse pantheon is the dominant (and virtually exclusive) human pantheon in the part of the world where this campaign takes place. If you are considering a god from another human pantheon, send me a PM and I'll let you know the details if that god is available. Keep in mind that worship of these "foreign" gods may not sit well with the people where the campaign takes place.

    Asa-Thor (God of Thunder and War)

    Thor's provinces are thunder and war. His symbols are the hammer pendant, lightning, and various depictions of combat. He is considered chaotic good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Followers of Asa-Thor learn to use a throwing hammer, and once per year must take down a creature or foe alone, using the hammer, and dedicate the kill to their god.
    • Taboo: No new quest or undertaking is started if there is a thunderstorm in progress.
    • Boon: Worshippers do +2 damage with any hammer, and receive a +2 to hit when throwing a hammer.


    * *

    Baldr (God of Resurrection and Light)

    Baldr is a deity of wisdom, the sun, and happiness. His provinces include these, as well as horses. His symbols are mistletoe, the sun, and a spear. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Once per year, the worshipper must hold a feast in honor of the god.
    • Taboo: All mistletoe must be destroyed on sight.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive +1 to their armor class while fighting in the sun.


    * *

    Brynhild (Goddes of Battle)

    Brynhild is a valkyrie depicted on a winged horse above a battlefield. Her province encompasses the recovery of heroes as they breathe their last breath, so that they may be taken to Asgard. Her symbols are a winged horse and a lance. Her worshippers are female. She is considered Chaotic Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: When a worshipper prepares to undertake battle, she makes a sacrifice to Brynhild.
    • Taboo: Worshippers may not use ranged weapons.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +2 to attacks from horseback.


    * *

    Freya (Goddess of Fertility and Marriage)

    Freya is the wife of Odin and goddess of the home and womanly things. He province is hearth and home. Her symbols are a doorway, a fireplace, a battleaxe, and an amber gem. She is considered Chaotic Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers must seek to build a home to themselves, dedicated to the goddess.
    • Taboo: Worshippers may attack no being that is pregnant.
    • Boon: When defending their homes or the home of a close friend, worshippers receive base attack bonuses as though they are two levels higher.


    * *

    Hel (Goddess of Death)

    Hel is the goddess of death and takes all souls who have not passed in battle. Her province is death and her symbols are a skeletal head, a black dagger, and a raven. She is considered Neutral.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: The dead must be interred with food.
    • Taboo: Worshippers are not allowed to eat on the day they bury a friend or comrade.
    • Boon: If the first blow of any battle is struck against a worshipper of Hel, it has a 50% chance of missing.


    * *

    Heimdall (The White God)

    Heimdall guards the Bifrost Bridge, though he has other aspects as well. His province includes the guardian of gates, and magic. His symbols are runes, the longship, and treasure piles. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers must perform a dedication ceremony upon any ship on which they travel.
    • Taboo: No worshipper may fight when a rainbow is in the sky.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +2 to armor class when guarding something a place or object.


    * *

    Loki (God of Evil and Trickery)

    Loki is the Father of Lies, the Shape-Changer, the Sky-Traveler, and the Ruler of Fire. He is much-worshipped among humans. His provinces are thieves, bards, and fire. His symbols are a lock pick, a hand axe, and a fanged snake. He is considered Neutral Evil.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshipper may not gain a level without making a blood sacrifice at night.
    • Taboo: Worshippers never deal in silver.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive +2 to lock picking and back stabbing.


    * *

    Odin (Ruler of All)

    Odin is the All-Father, and is often depicted riding an eight-legged steed. He sometimes appears as a one-eyed beggar. His provinces are wisdom, magic, and war. His symbols are a spear, a large hat, and the well of souls. He is considered Chaotic Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: At the solstice, the worshipper must provide a feast for his companions.
    • Taboo: Worshippers may not harm ravens or wolves.
    • Boon: Worshippers gain a +2 to WIS checks and a +2 to hit when fighting with spears if they are level 3 or higher.


    * *

    Tyr (God of Victory and Courage)

    Tyr is an old god who was replaced by Odin as leader of the gods . He placed his arm in the mouth of the wolf Fenrir so that it might be chained, and Fenrir ate the arm. Tyr's provinces are victory, courage, and truth. His symbols are the spear, a silver hand, and a shining helm. He is considered Lawful Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: Worshippers must subject themselves to tests of courage before battle.
    • Taboo: Worshippers never lie.
    • Boon: All worshippers specialize in the spear from first le
    vel.

    * *

    Uller (God of Archery, Magic, and Skiing)

    Uller is the closest to a nature god of any in the pantheon. HIs provinces are archery, magic, and skiing. His symbols are the bow and the arrow. He is considered Chaotic Good.

    For the devout:

    • Ceremony: The first kill of any year must be dedicated in a ritual to Uller.
    • Taboo: White-furred or skinned beasts cannot be attacked with a bow.
    • Boon: Worshippers receive a +2 to hit when using a bow
    .
     
  3. Legendary Sidekick

    Legendary Sidekick The HAM'ster Moderator

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    About Brynhild's boon: it says "+2 to attacks" while other boons say "+2 to hit."

    What is +2 to attacks? Is that additional damage? To-hit and damage? Uh… not that Baldhart would hop on a knight's horse while he's face-down in the snow without the intent to return the horse in the same condition in which she found her.
     
  4. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    Something just stuck out to me as I reread this... one of Baldr's symbols is mistletoe, yet under "taboos" it says all mistletoe must be destroyed on sight. Is that a taboo against destroying mistletoe, or against letting it live? Doesn't really make sense to me for a god to command his followers to destroy one of his symbols.
     
  5. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    The +2 is 'to hit.'

    I'm sure Baldhart would treat the horse nicely.
     
  6. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    Mistletoe is associated with Baldr, so I guess the symbol is used for him. In Norse mythology, Baldr's mother traveled the worlds securing an oath from all things that they would not harm Baldr (there was a prophecy about him dying). Turns out, she forgot to get the oath from mistletoe. One day, for sport, everyone is throwing dangerous stuff at Baldr, since none of it hurts him. Loki gives a mistletoe spear or dart or something to one of them, and he throws it at Baldr and strikes him dead.

    So mistletoe is associated with Baldr, but not in a good way.
     
  7. Legendary Sidekick

    Legendary Sidekick The HAM'ster Moderator

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    Cool, so it cancels my penalty until I can use both hands!
     
  8. Ravana

    Ravana Istar

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    Yeah, I noticed this too, among other irregularities, but wasn't going to say anything. My guess is Steerpike's using a "ready-made" pantheon from an official (and poorly written, if not poorly researched) gaming supplement. I've never heard of mistletoe being used as a symbol for Baldr, nor could imagine it ever would be. A more appropriate vegetative symbol would be mayweed or lily-of-the-valley. Which wouldn't affect things much either way, in terms of game play: it isn't like there are mistletoe forests just waiting to be burnt to the ground. Though I suppose it's more dignified to be trying to halt the spread of a parasitic growth than it is to be running around ripping up wildflowers.… ;)

    A similar problem rests with Odin's followers not being allowed to harm wolves. True, Odin is sometimes said to have a couple as companions; on the other hand, he's also destined to be slain by one (and not for lack on his part of trying to win the fight). Among Odin's eponyms are "Enemy of the Wolf" and "Foe of the Wolf"; while one might argue that this refers to a specific wolf–Fenrir–neither makes use of "the" wolf's name: they just use the normal Norse word for "wolf." (As does the presumably metaphorical one which translates as "Battle Wolf.") Considering how common wolves are in the lands where Odin's followers are also common, unless he can convince the wolves to return the favor it doesn't seem too likely the followers would be forbidden to harm them.

    They also confused Freya with Frigg–in this, they at least have some, though by no means extensive, support among scholars–and left her brother Freyr off entirely… by far the most important omission, in comparison to any of the other gods who also didn't make the list (really, the only major one, though it might've been nice to see Iðunn in there as well).

    Ah, well: that's the sort of thing you get when trying to reconcile several hundred years of stories and the conflation of attributes from a half-dozen or more deities into one. Which happened a lot. Odin, as is noted here, appears to have replaced Tyr in much of Nordic faith, and assumed much that was originally associated with him. Conversely, several of the attributes associated with Loki–including being a trickster and shape-changer–are also associated with Odin, and never were detached from him. But who wants a pantheon with two tricksters, eh?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2017
  9. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    Looking at this again has gotten me curious. This may be only slightly relevant, but where exactly do elves go when they die? It might be an interesting topic of conversation at some point.
     
  10. Nihal

    Nihal Vala

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    To HELL! Bwahahahaha!

    Sorry, I didn't resist.
     
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  11. Ravana

    Ravana Istar

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    "Official" D&D answer, or answer for this game world?

    In most settings, they'd go to join their deity in the afterlife, as does any mortal spirit. Or at least those mortal spirits who've lived lives their deities approve of… and the game has always left it an open question what percentage of the total this might be. There's always been the implication that a great many spirits end up not being selected for this honor, either because they've managed to offend the deity somehow by something they did in life, or because their lives were led so indifferently that the deity is indifferent in turn. What happens to these… depends widely on the game setting.

    That having been said: in this setting, none of the above might apply… whether to elves, or to anyone else. That's a GM call. Since it's rarely a topic that comes up, Steerpike and I haven't coordinated anything on the matter–and it's possible that different deities don't do things the same way even within the same game world. So I could give a tentative answer for what happens within the area I'm running, but even though that might be "official" for that region, it wouldn't necessarily apply globally. And since the elven gods aren't ones I originated, I'd feel wrong answering for them at all.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2017
  12. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    ^ Was looking for an answer specific to this game, if it's different than the "official" one. I just found it rather interesting since Cadell doesn't serve any god in particular; I'd call him agnostic. I doubt he's a full-on atheist though.
     
  13. Ravana

    Ravana Istar

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    Right–there's no reason the generic answer would apply anyway, if the GM doesn't like it. Just giving it to provide a general sense. Elves aren't treated any differently from any other race, in most cases. Well, apart from some earlier editions making them more difficult to raise from the dead, but that probably should have gone into "racial traits" were that the case here.

    The consequences of being agnostic, on the other hand, may not be pretty at all.…
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2017
  14. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    I have a small question about the instructions for worshippers of Oercus. Sacrifices are to be made "at the solstice" -- does that mean both summer and winter, or only one (probably summer)?
     
  15. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    I'd say both.
     
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  16. SeverinR

    SeverinR Vala

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    White skinned: Are we talking pale human skin or actually white, like albino human, ie will worshipping this god exclude shooting light skinned humanoids with a bow?
     
  17. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    To really give the taboo its intended flavor, I'm going to say it applies to truly white-furred or skinned creatures. Albinos of any creature would qualify, but apart from that they would have to be truly white, and that would have to be the dominant color. As with many things religious, it is subjective at some level. A solid white wolf would clearly violate the taboo. A white wolf with a bit of black at the tips of its paws and a black patch under the chin 'might' be considered a violation, because the white is so dominant. A black wolf with a white patch at its breast would not violate the taboo. In between are closer cases.

    The word 'beasts' precludes humans and other humanoids. As used there, 'beast' is going to mean something generally animal or monster-like and not one of the humanoid races.
     
  18. Keitsumah

    Keitsumah Inkling

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    ha, looks like Batos gets away free there then lol.

    also, unless Steer agrees to my idea I think Hel is starting to look very appealing -though i am not going to say why.

    well... query Steer would keit be able to see the ghosts of the dead then? I have a lot fo ideas of what i can do with that.

    Okay current god/goddess thin is duking it out between:

    Brynhild, Hel, and a possible new goddess
     
  19. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    Question that may or may not become relevant: if someone decides to make a dwarven cleric (or any devout dwarf, for that matter), what gods/goddesses are there to follow? I know of the one they call the All-Father, but that's it.
     
  20. Legendary Sidekick

    Legendary Sidekick The HAM'ster Moderator

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    @Keit,

    Brynhild and Hel are human goddesses. I did get into a PM conversation before, and I forgot what led to it (maybe the Baldy-Keit conversation when berry-picking the first time) but SP said it's possible for an elf to follow a human god/dess. What I'm not sure of is if you'd need a human to introduce you to that faith. So for Brynhild, you won't have trouble if that's the case.

    Um… talk to Gisla if Baldhart gets herself killed.


    Note the alignments: Brynhild = chaotic good, Hel = neutral. I guess you can be any alignment and worship Hel though, since SP lets neutral players follow evil god/desses.
     
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