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Good Fantasy Books for Children?

Discussion in 'Novels & Stories' started by Androxine Vortex, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. Androxine Vortex

    Androxine Vortex Archmage

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    I the other night my little brother comes into my room and says he can't sleep. He asked me to tell him a story. Even though he's almost 9 he is in love with Skyrim (He plays it more than I do lol even though he just runs around hunting dragons and killing wild animals) and so I made up a Skyrim based story. Ever since then he asks me to make up another story almost every night!

    So I wanted to know if there are any good Fantasy style stories for young children. You know, nothing too dark or violent but full of magic and "adventure."

    I also would like to someday create a book of collected fantasy short stories for children so I want to know if any of know any good ones out there! Sort of like a "bedtime story" book and will act as a stepping stone to get children into the fantasy genre.
     
  2. Saigonnus

    Saigonnus Auror

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    I read one as a kid called Sir Nobonk and the Terrible, Awful, Dreadful Dragon... I only vaguely remember the story, but it was basically about an elderly knight who wanted to save the dragons. I looked it up and it is for sale on Amazon.
     
  3. Rikilamaro

    Rikilamaro Inkling

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    At age 9 my dad had already read the Chronicles of Narnia to me, plus the Lord of the Rings. I would suggest Eragon by Christopher Paolini, the first couple Harry Potters may be ok, the Redwall series, or Emily Rodda's Rowan series.
     
  4. kadenaz

    kadenaz Scribe

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    The more children know, the sooner they will become adult.
    "Safe" books look safe but they make children stay in a little world that sooner or later will be too little for them.
     
  5. Ophiucha

    Ophiucha Auror

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    "he is in love with Skyrim" "nothing too dark or violent"
    Are we talking about the same game, here? I think the least 'dark' thing in that game is the Samguine quest, and that involves heavy drinking, a joke about 'consummating' a relationship with a hargraven, and questionable business practices with goats.

    That aside, at 8, I had just gotten into Harry Potter, so that would be the easy and obvious recommendation. You can read a couple of chapters a night rather easily. For some shorter stories, something you can read through in a night, I'd recommend some of the works of Neil Gaiman. There's also the classics: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, the Oz books, Narnia (the Christian imagery turned me off the series as a child, but that might not bother your brother). How to Train Your Dragon is a cute book, though I preferred the film. I'd probably recommend The Hobbit over the whole Lord of the Rings trilogy, if not for the length than for the themes. The Earthsea series, by Ursula K. LeGuin. Which 'inspired' Eragon, in a rip-off kind of way. Not a book I'd recommend usually, but a kid won't know the difference, so either series would probably be fine.
     
  6. Androxine Vortex

    Androxine Vortex Archmage

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    I said all he does is run around hunting dragons and wolves, he doesn't do quests. He likes exploring and the animals. And thank you for the suggestions.

    @Kadenaz
    I'm sorry but that doesn't make any sense. I'm asking for a harmless bedtime story. With the mentality of your suggestion I should read to him the Divine Comedy and why stop there? Let's let him watch Sparticus. I mean come on, you're telling me Green Eggs & Ham is a "dangerous" book?
     
  7. Telcontar

    Telcontar Staff Moderator

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    There is a fantasy series I read as a kid that I remember pretty fondly. It took some searching to find the name of it again (it's been awhile) but it was called "The Enchanted Forest Chronicles" and it starts with the book "Dealing with Dragons."

    It's a pretty old series, so I don't know how easy or hard it might be to find now.

    Redwall is also fun, I enjoyed those as a kid too.
     
  8. drkpyn

    drkpyn Scribe

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    I've always felt like The Hobbit read more like a children's book than anything else, which is exactly why I love it so much.
     
  9. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    Those are by Patricia Wrede. I don't think it would be too hard to find them through Amazon or other online outlets.
     
  10. Queshire

    Queshire Auror

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    For wore modern books I suggest the Percy Jackson sereies as well as the Fable Haven sereies. Those border on urban fantasy at times but are still good.
     
  11. Hominid

    Hominid Dreamer

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    I recommend the Lionboy trilogy by Zizou Corder. I would hardly call them "fantasy," though--they're sort of a weird hybrid between fantasy, "realistic" adventure, and science fiction. The main fantastical element is that the main character can talk to cats and other members of the Felidae family. After his parents are kidnapped, he goes on a quest to find them, befriending a group of circus lions and promising to return them to Africa. They were published from 2004 to 2006, and they are very original and full of adventure and fun characters.
     
  12. Xanados

    Xanados Maester

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    I am violently opposed to the idea that the Lord of the Rings is a children's book. I can't even describe how pathetic that sounds.

    It is not.

    That is all I will say.

    Edit: I don't mean to cause any commotion, but that is just such an absurd notion! Garh!
     
  13. Elder the Dwarf

    Elder the Dwarf Maester

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    Harry Potter is wonderful, of course, but it can be a bit scary to really young kids. Still, that is a great series, but try not to read too fast, you don't want to get to book 5 when he's still 10. Redwall is definitely the best suggestion I can give you. I read about 15 of them by the time I was 10, and I absolutely loved those books. They're about talking animals with swords and stuff, what could be more kid friendly? Plus, you can have fun with the different accents and voices the writing lends to the characters.
     
  14. Ophiucha

    Ophiucha Auror

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    I can't imagine finding the Harry Potter books to be scary by the time you're 9 years old.

    @Xanados, I don't think they are meant for kids, but I don't think that means kids can't handle them. I saw the first film when I was nine, and couldn't have been older than eleven or twelve by the time the last one came out. And I read at least the first one before the film came out (not of my own volition, mind, but my dad made me). The language might be challenging for someone younger than ten, but I don't think there's anything in it a kid couldn't handle.
     
  15. Hominid

    Hominid Dreamer

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    Agreed. I'm opposed to the notion that when children read a book, it somehow disrespects the book. Children are people just like anyone else; if they can't handle something, they can't handle something, but otherwise, nothing bad happens to the book.
     
  16. It should be noted that most fairytale stories were once thought for adults rather than children (poisonous apples and evil stepsisters...). Don't be overly afraid with what books you give him, I'm a coward but none of the books that I read when I was younger affected me much, only films and Courage the Cowardly Dog (somehow a cartoon for children) had that power over me. I'd recommend Roald Dahl (Twits, Witches, etc.), Harry Potter, Alice in Wonderland and perhaps Narnia. Though I'd stop with Harry Potter at book 3 or 4.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2012
  17. Elder the Dwarf

    Elder the Dwarf Maester

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    Yeah, but have you read the original fairy tales? Ariel dies and the prince marries another girl. Hansel and Gretel are abandoned in the woods by a terrible father and in some versions murder their stepmother. The original fairy tales weren't quite as peachy as disney movies or modern collections have made them.

    Still, I agree with your point. Just wanted to point that out.
     
  18. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    I read Lord of the Rings for the first time when I was about ten (the copy I had was a single book). Most people I know who are fans of the book first read it as children. I think it is just fine for kids if they turn out to be interested in it.
     
  19. Elder the Dwarf

    Elder the Dwarf Maester

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    I read the same version (all in one book) in 4th grade, which would be around 10 I guess.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2012
  20. I read LotR for the first time when I was around 21, and I loved it. (It wasn't my first exposure to fantasy, not by a long shot.) So take that for what it's worth.

    I remember being most astonished by the fact that Sauron does not actually appear once in the whole book!
     
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