Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 38 of 38

Thread: It's Not What You Know, It's Who You Know

  1. #31
    Senior Member Russ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    1,750
    Reputation
    4796
    Quote Originally Posted by oenanthe View Post
    well, see, I have all these social connections in publishing, so all signs point to yes. that's the argument, isn't it?

    Honestly, I can't evaluate my own work, really. I like it. that's a pretty meaningless thing to say, though.
    Let us know when it hits the market. Then we can chime in

    I have a boatload of connections in publishing, and I don't know of any instance were someone published something from a friend or relative that fell well below standard.

    I know of lots of instances where books failed or turned out to be below standard, but that had nothing to do with social connections.
    “Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday.”- John Wayne

  2. Thanks Demesnedenoir thanked for this post
  3. #32
    Senior Member Ronald T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Grass Valley, California
    Posts
    145
    Reputation
    522
    I have to agree with psychotick.

    Luck and knowing an insider can open doors that might remain closed otherwise. But if a writer or an artist has nothing to back up those helpful, but scarce, benefits, they too will be barred from entering those doors.

    Luck is the one component we have little control over. But we have full control of the quality of our product. If we can't show that we possess the promise of being a proficient writer, no insider is going to risk their reputation by opening that door for us.

    And as Greg said, if you want to test the quality of your writing, there is always e-publishing available. However, that is an unbelievably difficult route to take as well. All the work of effective publicity falls squarely on your shoulders. And the only thing that will make you a success is "Word of Mouth".

    That means you must actually know something about good writing and good story-telling, and have the ability to create it. In the world of e-publishing, it's not about "who you know", but "what you know". Word of mouth only works if you can write well and tell a good story. It's all about your skill level as a writer, and then about how good you are at self-promotion.

    However, it's a frustratingly slow process no matter how you go about it. We can only hope that Lady Luck takes an unlikely shine to us.

    So, all I can say to any writer is...Good Luck, and never give up.

  4. Thanks Sheilawisz, Michael K. Eidson thanked for this post
  5. #33
    Senior Member ThinkerX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,515
    Portfolio Entries
    3
    Reputation
    5237
    For what little it may be worth...

    I subscribed to 'Asimov's' and 'Fantasy and Science Fiction,' two of the longest running magazines in the genre a couple years back. I'd hoped to find interesting stories from new authors.

    Instead...

    1 - Most of the stories were by 'name' authors with multiple novels under their belts; and

    2 - in my opinion, a substantial number of those stories simply were not very good. No exaggeration to say that a few of the 'Iron Pen' or 'Top Scribe' tales were better than those - the work of new or novice writers.

    I am tempted to conclude that many of those stories were published not because of the stories merits, but because of the authors name.

    That said, I have run into a lot of subpar self published online works, usually by newcomers, but sometimes by professionals as well.

  6. Thanks Russ thanked for this post
  7. #34
    I have concluded that one of the best ways to become a famous writer is to become famous for something else first. I have a friend who is a rather well known musician and dabbles at novels on the side. They are good enough books but I doubt they would sell nearly so well without her name recognition. That was her 'foot in the door' and it certainly helped her gain entry to the world of publishing.
    Epics ever favor the winner.

  8. #35
    Moderator skip.knox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    2,836
    Portfolio Entries
    4
    Reputation
    8050
    I had a similar experience, ThinkerX, though I came a different conclusion. My big surprise was how many stories were pretty well written, but which ended badly. Over and over I encountered well-written stories that moved along, caught my interested, and then simply stopped. They did not end, they just stopped. No climax, no point, no insight.

    My conclusion was that there is a kind of story that current editors like, but which I do not. I saw this in more than one magazine, so more than one editor. Naturally certain authors appear multiple times. This implies no conspiracy of the privileged but merely shows that people tend to stick with what they know and, in the case of magazines, what they know sells. These operations run very close to the bone.

    There was a time when, if John Campbell didn't like your work, you were relegated to the pulps. Some authors, like Asimov, were getting published before they were even out of high school. Other authors worked years before they found the editor who would listen.

    I don't know how many different ways to say this. It's been said on this thread multiple times. Yes, being connected helps. That's why you network. But no, no, a hundred times no, being connected is not the *only* way to get published. If no one buys my stuff, it's because no one wants it. If they do want it, but don't have room for it, they tell me. If they think it's pretty good but still not quite publishable, they tell me that, too.

    Rejection is not a synonym for conspiracy.
    Skip's Writing Tip of the Day: write.
    Visit Altearth or visit my blog
    Historical Background for Fantasy Writers

  9. Thanks Michael K. Eidson thanked for this post
  10. #36
    Senior Member Russ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    1,750
    Reputation
    4796
    Quote Originally Posted by ThinkerX View Post
    For what little it may be worth...

    I subscribed to 'Asimov's' and 'Fantasy and Science Fiction,' two of the longest running magazines in the genre a couple years back. I'd hoped to find interesting stories from new authors.

    Instead...

    1 - Most of the stories were by 'name' authors with multiple novels under their belts; and

    2 - in my opinion, a substantial number of those stories simply were not very good. No exaggeration to say that a few of the 'Iron Pen' or 'Top Scribe' tales were better than those - the work of new or novice writers.

    I am tempted to conclude that many of those stories were published not because of the stories merits, but because of the authors name.

    That said, I have run into a lot of subpar self published online works, usually by newcomers, but sometimes by professionals as well.
    I can't comment on the quality of the stories but you are dead right that it is harder than ever for new authors to break into those mags because they believe that name authors sell more copies from them. When they are serializing someone's freaking novel it eats up a lot of space!
    “Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday.”- John Wayne

  11. #37
    Senior Member Demesnedenoir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Shadowy redoubt of my mind
    Posts
    895
    Reputation
    2421
    Exactly, I doubt the margin on short story magazines is high profit, they need to sell as many copies as they can, and names will help.

    Quote Originally Posted by Russ View Post
    I can't comment on the quality of the stories but you are dead right that it is harder than ever for new authors to break into those mags because they believe that name authors sell more copies from them. When they are serializing someone's freaking novel it eats up a lot of space!
    Craven Raven, black of feather and black of beak,
    of what today shall we speak?

  12. #38
    After all, an insider who advocates for your hypothetically bad manuscript is putting their reputation on the line and has to make a case beyond "this is my buddy".

  13. Thanks Chessie, neodoering thanked for this post
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

It's Not What You Know, It's Who You Know   It's Not What You Know, It's Who You Know   It's Not What You Know, It's Who You Know