1. Welcome to the Fantasy Writing Forums. Register Now to join us.

Units of measurement - time

Discussion in 'World Building' started by Aldarion, Jan 7, 2020.

  1. Aldarion

    Aldarion Sage

    299
    132
    43
    TIME

    Ordinary year is 365 days long, and leap year is 366 days long. Eight leap years in every millenium (all 00 years but 500. and 1000.) have a day removed from them, making them 365 days long.

    Year is divided into twelve months, grouped in 6 pairs. First month of a pair is 29 days long and second is 30 days long. Remaining 11 days are placed between the months. These are called intercalarii (intercalary days), and are considered holidays. Months are counted numerically: Unimber, Binimber, Trinimber, Quadrimber, Quinimber, Senimber, September, October, November, December, Undecember, Duodecember.

    Week has seven days. Each month has four weeks, but one or two days per month are left outside the week, and are also holidays. Days within the week are marked with letters: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or simply called feria prima, feria secunda, feria tertia, feria quarta, feria quinta, feria sexta, feria septima. Extra day is called dies Solis, with dies Lunae also appearing in 30-day months. These used to be at the end of a month, but were shifted to middle of the month on 615 AUC. Thus middle day or middle two days of a month are holidays. Intercalary days outside the months are termed intercalarius primus, intercalarius secundus etc., and are placed in between the months.

    Day is divided into twelve horae (hours), beginning at sunrise and ending at sunset. Night is divided into four vigilae (watches). This division is mostly used only in the military. Astrological day is divided into 24 equal hours, beginning at midnight, and this is usually used for civilian purposes (time is kept by spring-driven clocks).

    Seasons may also be noted – spring, summer, autumn and winter. These correspond to phases, with elemental names – earth for spring, fire for summer, air for autumn and water for winter.

    Years are numbered either AUC (Ab Urbe Condita – since founding of the city) or else AOM (Annus Origine Mundi). Currently, year is 2215 AUC or 7724 AOM. Years earlier than founding are listed as PUC (Prior in Urbe Condita). Other than that, there are several other time-keeping systems.

    Years are also counted by the ruler who was crowned in that year. Particular year may be the fifth year of the reign of Emperor [Insert Name].

    Fourth calendar is indictionary. This system utilizes the fiscal adjustment year of the baseline. Tax assessment is carried out every 15 years. Year 2215 AUC is also the 10th year of 148th indiction cycle.

    NOTE: starting year for the story is equivalent to 1461. in history. Rome was founded 753 BC

    1461 - Wikipedia

    NOTE2: YEAR CALCULATION

    Astronomical year is 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, 45 seconds long. Calendar year is 365 days long. This makes astronomical year 31 556 925 seconds long, and calendar year 31 536 000 seconds long.

    Every 4 years, a day is added (24 hours, 86 400 seconds). As a result, four astronomical years have 126 227 700 seconds, and four calendar years 126 230 400 seconds.

    Astronomical century has 3 155 692 500 seconds, while 25 calendar quartets would have 3 155 760 000 seconds. Astronomical millenium has 31 556 925 000 seconds, while calendar millenium would have 31 557 600 000 seconds. Thus one day is removed from a year every 125 years (eight years per millenium), leaving calendar millenium at 31 556 908 800 seconds, 16 200 seconds shorter than astronomical millenium. This requires an additional day every 5 millenia, meaning that 5-millenia period is 157 784 625 000 seconds in nature and 157 784 630 400 seconds in calendar, or 5 400 seconds more.

    Not counting an additional day every 5 millenia, which is too long of a period to be accounted for, Vetronian calendar millenium would be 16 200 seconds or 0,0000513359% shorter than astronomical millenium. A year would thus be 16,2 seconds shorter than astronomical year on average, for 16 200 seconds or 0,1875 days every 1 000 years. This lack of 4 hours, 30 minutes and 0 seconds makes it more accurate than Numenorean calendar (4 hours, 46 minutes, 40 seconds every 1 000 years).

    skip.knoxskip.knox Above looks good?

    EDIT: Just a note, but in Croatian Dalmatian dialect, "ferija" means "holiday". So all Roman days would be holidays.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
    elemtilas likes this.
  2. elemtilas

    elemtilas Sage

    385
    170
    43
    Do you not mean "seximber"?

    As for Binimber, Trinimber, Quadrimber, Quinimber, I'd suggest:

    Duomber, Tresember, Quatrember, & Quinquimber.

    Bis is an adverb and trinus is an adjective while quadrus means "square". The numerical month names take their forms from the cardinal numbers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
  3. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

    6,079
    3,920
    313
    Sure, all looks fine. One nice thing about working with an alternate Earth is I don't have to make up calendars and such. I only have to dig them up. Er, research them. :)

    elemtilaselemtilas makes a valid point. Beware the Latinwonk, my son. The gerunds that jab! The ablatives of place!
    (utterly irrelevant note: I saw Monty Python's Life of Brian in theatrical release in the 70s. I was taking Latin at the time. The audience all laughed at the Romans they go the home bit, but I was the one clutching my sides with tears rolling down my face)
     
    Demesnedenoir and elemtilas like this.
  4. Aldarion

    Aldarion Sage

    299
    132
    43
    Thanks. I used actual numerical month names as a guideline, but I guess I screwed up there. In fact I was originally going to use those names you suggested, but then I saw name of a month, don't recall which, which seemed to follow a different pattern...

    Making stuff up is half the fun, though. And I will note that I actually assumed alternate Earth myself, when it comes to climate, day period, year and so on. I just figured making up a calendar based on old Roman one would be fun.
     
    elemtilas likes this.
  5. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

    6,079
    3,920
    313
    >Making stuff up is half the fun, though.
    Indeed. I've considered it, but after four novels I have yet to find a need to say a month's name. The season has been enough. I may have referenced a day of the week once or twice, but using anything other than standard English would have been a distraction. Other stories will vary, obviously!

    If you can find a copy of Medieval Studies somewhere, there's a nice essay in there by R. Dean Ware on medieval chronology. You may know most of it already, but there's always the bibliography! Make sure it's the first edition; I'm not sure that essay made it into later editions. The book overall is a great introduction to the discipline; it includes essays on diplomatics, numismatics, paleography, prosopography, art, music, and even historical demography by Herlihy. The editor was James Powell.
     
    Aldarion likes this.
  6. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

    6,079
    3,920
    313
    >Making stuff up is half the fun, though.
    Indeed. I've considered it, but after four novels I have yet to find a need to say a month's name. The season has been enough. I may have referenced a day of the week once or twice, but using anything other than standard English would have been a distraction. Other stories will vary, obviously!

    If you can find a copy of Medieval Studies somewhere, there's a nice essay in there by R. Dean Ware on medieval chronology. You may know most of it already, but there's always the bibliography! Make sure it's the first edition; I'm not sure that essay made it into later editions. The book overall is a great introduction to the discipline; it includes essays on diplomatics, numismatics, paleography, prosopography, art, music, and even historical demography by Herlihy. The editor was James Powell.
     
  7. Aldarion

    Aldarion Sage

    299
    132
    43
    Found it. Thanks.
    Medieval Studies
     
    skip.knox likes this.
  8. Aldarion

    Aldarion Sage

    299
    132
    43
    I managed to locate my Latin textbooks. Anyway, translations look like this now:
    1. Unimber
    2. Duober
    3. Treseber
    4. Quatrilis / Quatriber
    5. Quinqilis / Quinqiber
    6. Sexilis / Sexiber
    7. September
    8. October
    9. November
    10. December
    11. Undecimber
    12. Duodecimber
    Not sure whether to have them all on -ber or not.
     
Loading...

Share This Page