Explanation of Jewish Customs and Beliefs?

Discussion in 'Research' started by James The Dragon Dude, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. TheKillerBs

    TheKillerBs Grandmaster

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    Most mainstream Christians consider further explanation of the Trinity besides “One God in Three Holy Persons” to be heretical too.
     
  2. Devor

    Devor Fiery Keeper of the Hat Moderator

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    Not exactly... for example, there's a lot of information about it in John 1 and the book of Hebrews.
     
  3. TheKillerBs

    TheKillerBs Grandmaster

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    I was talking more about the nature of the Trinity. For example, what pmmg said about the Trinity being three aspects of the same God would be considered the heresy of Modalism or Partialism by most mainstream Christians, especially Catholics
     
  4. pmmg

    pmmg Dark Lord

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    I think the Catholics are pretty clear on what they believe, they certainly have a lot of mechanisms to say what is right and what is not. Engaging in a philosophical pursuit of the nature of the trinity does not necessarily rise to the level of heresy in my book, least not the type that people get burned at the stake over, but I do live in a more accepting time.

    The divine trinity is held by Catholics as a great mystery, and so I am sure many of them would stumble over explaining it, but there is no other answer than that Catholics are taught there is only one God. St. Patrick, my name sake, is said to have used shamrocks as a way of showing the three actually being one.

    I am not sure what any of that has to do with Jewish traditions, but I had wondered if the Bible might not be a decent enough source for picking up on a few of them. After all, the Jewish faith does play prominently in it.
     
  5. Devor

    Devor Fiery Keeper of the Hat Moderator

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    @AllTheHeresyTalk, plenty of people use bad analogies and watered down phrases to describe the trinity - unless they intend it to be a literal and formal explanation, it's usually fine.
     
  6. CupofJoe

    CupofJoe Valar Lord

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    This came to me and may be of interest:
    The Talmud: A Methodological Introduction
    About this course: The Talmud is one of the richest and most complicated works of literature the world has ever known. Since being composed around 1500 years ago it has inspired not only religious reverence but significant intellectual engagement. In this course learners will be introduced to the unique characteristics of this text and the challenges that inhere in studying it while studying a chapter of the Talmud. Students of the course can expect to develop an appreciation for how the Talmud works and why it continues to inspire religious and intellectual devotion. They will be challenged to employ critical reading skills and to analyze legal and historical concepts.
     
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