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Current Social Media Strategy

Discussion in 'Marketing' started by Cargoplayer, Nov 18, 2020.

  1. Cargoplayer

    Cargoplayer Acolyte

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    Getting there on my trilogy, it’s epic fantasy. I have written a prequel novella to go with it, which I’m planning to use for promotional purposes. I’m intending on starting to send the first book out to agents in the new year, see how that goes. I have first drafts of books 2 and 3 done as well. Initial web site set up, mailing list set up. None of it’s public yet.

    My question is, can anyone point at helpful strategies for social media use for epic fantasy. I’ve read/heard through various podcasts that Facebook is probably the best place for epic fantasy. Anyone have any thoughts?

    I’m looking for strategies on how to try and get some followers happening before I submit, just to get a leg up. It’ll be helpful spreading info, and agents and publishers seem to like it. There do seem to be some folks able to do this without having published content. Simply liking other authors and fans has been brought up as a way forward. Again any thoughts, or if anyone can point at some recent literature/books/podcasts with info, I’d love to hear about it.
     
  2. Chasejxyz

    Chasejxyz Minstrel

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    It's really great that you're thinking this far ahead, but if you're going traditional publishing, you don't need a ton of this on your own. Having a big following is good if you ALREADY have it (such as celebrities/internet famous people) or if you're a subject matter expert writing a nonfiction book. Hilary Duff has a YA series, and the reason that is is because she's already got a big name, not because the book is awesome or ground breaking. If you have a following because of other things you've made (like a web comic, youtube channel or fanfiction series), then that MIGHT help you, since you already have a following, but if you don't already have one, then making it isn't going to help. Having fan pages for a story that isn't published, sold or even represented is kind of weird and I don't know how agents are going to take that.
     
  3. Cargoplayer

    Cargoplayer Acolyte

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    Well, it's one of those good to have things at the start, from what I've read and listened to. If you follow other people who are writers and readers, they will follow you back. You just have normal interactions with them, though you need to be up front about the fact that at some point, you'll have books you'd like to promote. So, when the time comes, if you have a few hundred to a thousand followers, which you can slowly build up over time this way, then you have a promotional outlet, and it shows the publishers that you're willing to do the work. If you're good about interacting with people, and how you interact with them, then they'll be more likely to check out your stuff when it's published. It's just, which platform, and any particular strategies aside from the above?

    Going to try Twitter for a bit, I think, and see how it goes.
     
  4. Chasejxyz

    Chasejxyz Minstrel

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    I do digital marketing for my day job, so I know a bit about this. It is very, very easy to sink countless hours (and hundreds if not thousands of dollars) into social media with little results. Yes, showing that you're willing to "do the work" is nice, but publishers have their own marketing departments, with their own professionals and budgets and pre-built mailing lists, followers and communities. They have relationships with reviewers to get your book out there. They do not expect you to have those things or the skill to do those things. They expect you to write well and not say dumb stuff on the Internet. Anything else is a bonus but not necessary.

    Being on social media and interacting with other writers/authors/agents is mostly for your own benefit, not the book's. Stuff like #TenQueries or #AskAnAgent on Twitter can give you a lot of insight on the process and prevent you from making mistakes that can get your submission thrown out. You'll stay on top of industry news and trends. You'll discover other authors who write stuff you like and you'll learn more about your market. You might even make some real friends! If you google around you'll find lists and hashtags to follow but you'll curate your own in time as you learn more. Personally, I don't think you (or anyone) should be on Facebook, but it's good if you want to have actual person-to-person relationships with people (like you do with your family members). Authors aren't going to accept friend requests from randos, tho, so you'll need to start those relationships elsewhere first.
     
  5. Ned Marcus

    Ned Marcus Sage

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    It's good that you've already set up a website and mailing list (which are the basics). I think FB is the best social media to use because of the huge amount of people using it; therefore, your audience will most likely be there too. I'm not sure how essential any of the others are. If you really think your audience will be on a particular social media channel, then go for it, but be careful you don't waste valuable writing time on social media.

    I read David Gaughran's blog (davidgaughran.com) and am on his mailing list. Lots of good book marketing stuff there.
     
    skip.knox likes this.
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