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Does this sound like Fantasy to you?

Discussion in 'Writing Discussions' started by SaltyDog, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. SaltyDog

    SaltyDog Sage

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    I guess so. Algaranth, or Hecklans, probably, which hey... those are some good names, hmm... lol. So thank you for your feed back. I'm going to play around with it, and I'll certainly have enough time to work with it when I get around to finishing and editing.
     
  2. Behold, a name with ten apostrophes and no vowels:

    Hg'mhl'dr'lld'gsd'vl'zvs'tgl'mhh'll'dzs
     
  3. SaltyDog

    SaltyDog Sage

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    sounds good! Can I use it? Lol just kidding. I'm pretty sure that is not Fantasy.
     
  4. Ireth

    Ireth Myth Weaver

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    My brain hurts.
     
  5. Penpilot

    Penpilot Staff Article Team

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    That is glorious. Unfortunately, I tried to pronounce the name out loud. I'm going into surgury right now to reattach my tongue.
     
  6. KC Trae Becker

    KC Trae Becker Troubadour

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    Some of us are purists when it comes to mythologies and nationalities. Sorry to be that kind of person, but it's kind of like expecting good science in my science fiction.

    But...

    though orcs and goblins are not originally Celtic, there have been historical instances of some Celtic mythological creatures being referred as goblins (even Leprechauns). Tolkien and others have conflated orcs and goblins, so you could probably make a good, maybe even legitimate case for the Irish/Scottish name on an orc in your story.

    And that being said, there are plenty of bad science - science fiction stories that few find fault with, even if I would.
     
    SaltyDog likes this.
  7. SaltyDog

    SaltyDog Sage

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    Which I understand. Thanks for your feedback
     
  8. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    This makes sense when a fantasy story is set in what is basically the real world, with some fantasy twists, but if it is set in a wholly-invented world, then there is no reason to expect that names, nationalities, mythologies, or anything else would follow similar patterns to those found in real history.
     
  9. KC Trae Becker

    KC Trae Becker Troubadour

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    I generally agree, but the similarity to specific national patterns while trying to be wholly-invented seems inconsistent. Any author is welcome to be inconsistent and even purists will over look it if the story is good. But consistency can make the reading easier for more readers, like me, who have a hang up. My hang up may be a personal problem no one else need worry about, but I prefer authors who make efforts at consistency.

    Names are easily morphed. Back stories are too. Efforts at consistency can help develop deeper characters and world building. But again, this is just a personal preference.
     
  10. Kittie Brandybuck

    Kittie Brandybuck Minstrel

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    I don't get why that person said that. I think the nane sounds very fantastical.
     
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