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How much do you make self-publishing?

Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Muqtada, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. Black Dragon

    Black Dragon Staff Administrator

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    I asked you twice to list some of your publications.

    If you were in fact a "major publisher," you would be able to do so. The fact that you will not comply with this simple request speaks volumes.

    If you are able to provide a list of publications, you can send it to us via our contact page. Until then, I am closing your account to protect our members.
     
  2. TWErvin2

    TWErvin2 Auror

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    The suggested search provided:

    LESTAT PUBLISHING Society: ASCAP IPI No. 344657349
    Contact:
    LESTAT PUBLISHING
    % FRANK PANETTA
    309 CHARBRIDGE
    LAPEER, MI 48446
    Tel. (810) 660-8000
    Email: [email protected]


    The content/results really didn't address any of the questions asked.
     
    Devor likes this.
  3. Kelise

    Kelise Maester

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    ...A hotmail account sure speaks volumes, though. That's utterly hilarious.
     
  4. sashamerideth

    sashamerideth Maester

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    That's what I thought as well. Not enough facts, not enough substance, should we all phone the published phone number, day and night?
     
  5. Philip Overby

    Philip Overby Staff Article Team

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    Here's some info:

    [link removed]

    Note From Black Dragon:
    Phil posted a link to an ad from the publisher in question. This ad was posted on a free classifieds site. Unfortunately, when I clicked on the link it set off my anti-malware protection, indicating that the site is infected.

    Here's an excerpt from the ad:

     
  6. gerald.parson

    gerald.parson Troubadour

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    seems-legit-candy-van-seems-legit-kidnapping-demotivational-posters-1313956238.jpg This is his day job.
     
  7. Philip Overby

    Philip Overby Staff Article Team

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    Crap...:(

    Sorry, I didn't know the site was infected. I didn't get any notice when I went there. I'll be more careful with links I post here.
     
  8. Black Dragon

    Black Dragon Staff Administrator

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    Don't worry about it, Phil. Stuff happens. In any case, we appreciate you getting to the bottom of this.
     
  9. kennyc

    kennyc Inkling

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    Well, now back to the original topic. Anyone else have info/examples about self-publishing, particularly of e-books?

    And also I'd be interested in comparisons of e-publishing to traditional publishing if anyone has had both experiences.

    Thanks.
     
  10. Muqtada

    Muqtada Scribe

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    Haha who would've thought a question about e-publishing would cause so much excitement!
     
  11. TWErvin2

    TWErvin2 Auror

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    I can't speak directly to self-published, ebook route, but I can speak to my experience with the more traditional route via a small press (Gryphonwood Press).

    I'm not the top seller with Gryphonwood. I know a couple of the authors do far better than I do, but my numbers are respectable, at least enough that my publisher published the second novel in my fantasy series. I get paid quarterly and sometimes the royalties are sufficient to make (equal to making) a monthly truck payment with enough left over to go out to dinner. Other times it's enough to put gas in the truck for a couple weeks. (I drive a Chevy Colorado).

    So, I'm not getting rich, but folks are reading my novels and that's what it's mainly about. The money is handy, but I don't think even if my works took off, I'd quit my day job. I really enjoy it as much as writing. As an aside, I often donate the royalties to charities and causes I think are important.

    There are advantages to having a publisher as opposed to self-publishing, as well as disadvantages, but that's a discussion for another thread.

    In the end, self-publishing won't do anything positive for the writer (financially or reputation/career-wise) if what's published is poor or substandard quality, whether it's due to weak: storyline, storytelling, writing, grammar, editing, formatting or any combination (plus a few things not listed).
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
    kennyc likes this.
  12. Codey Amprim

    Codey Amprim Staff Article Team

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    Well it seems this thread is heading in a nice direction.

    Time to sit back with some popcorn.

    But seriously, on both sides, we need to act professionally. Not that I'm a moderator or in any type of position to be saying anything, but where is your boss? I'd have you fired in an instant. There is no need to talk like that in a potential business setting, or any other professional setting.

    The reasons why there are so many questions about your company's legitimacy are quite obvious, are they not? As a publisher, wouldn't you understand this? Hmm.

    Writers in general, not just the fine folks here, should and do take pride and value in what they make, and for us especially, our works are parts of our lives. Think of it as if it were your newborn child. We aren't going to hand it over that easily. Would you trust a stranger with your child? I think not.

    To avoid this altogether, you should first try to answer the questions you think you would want to know if you were a member of the audience. This really helps avoid situations like this, and makes everything go a lot smoother.

    Also, I shan't say a word about your writing style, either, for I find that it speaks for itself!


    EDIT: Sorry if this laugh-a-palooza was dead, and I added to it. I was on my phone, and it sent me to the beginning of this whole thing, little did I realize I was on the first page. Woopsies.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  13. Philip Overby

    Philip Overby Staff Article Team

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    I think having insight in how to go about getting published with a small press is extremely useful. I think there is a large focus on self-publishing but not as much on small presses. Any further advice you may have for aspiring writers to get noticed by small presses could be really helpful. However, that may be better suited for another thread.

    I have known several authors who self-published who sell pretty well. They don't roll in cash or anything, but they do a good job promoting their work and eventually translating that into a more traditional route. From what I understand, you have to have that "entrepreneurial spirit" in order to get a self-published novel where it makes enough money to support you. So not only do you have to be a great writer but also a master marketer. Marketing can go a long way to selling almost anything. Of course, that's the case for any writer. You can't just write something awesome and then sit back and say, "Well, I'm published. Sweet. Let's see that money roll in." I'd say a sound marketing strategy is any writer's best weapon, self-published or traditional.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  14. Legendary Sidekick

    Legendary Sidekick The HAM'ster Moderator

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    A hotmail account that is 62 days old or less, seeing how "2012" is part of the account name.
     
  15. gerald.parson

    gerald.parson Troubadour

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    Id agree with that, marketing is a huge factor, as it is with almost any business. I mean crap, a guy made millions buy selling a rock in a box.
     
  16. MichaelSullivan

    MichaelSullivan Maester

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    This is true in traditionally publishing, where the publisher invests money and employees time to produce the work. But in a "vanity press" the publisher will publish anything, regardless of quality, as long as the requisite fees are paid. I'm not sure how that provides any 'credentials.'

    And if those 10 movies were made by you...it doesn't prove anything one way or the other.
     
  17. MichaelSullivan

    MichaelSullivan Maester

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    My self-publishing experience revolves aound 5 novels and one short-story. While I published the novels in both e-book and print formats - the vast majority of the sales were in ebooks. The books were on sale from April 2008 - August 2011 and I sold70,000+ copies across 5 titltes.

    My "traditional" publishing experience includes a small press - who did a traditional print run (which sold out after 14 months and then the right reverted to me) and signing with Orbit (Fantasy imprint of Hachette Book Group) who has publihsed my six-book Riyria Revelations as a triology: Theft of Swords (Nov 2011), Rise of Empire (Dec 2011), Heir of Novron (Jan 2012).

    Both experiences, self and traditional have been good ones for me. Both have various pros and cons. What in particular were you looking for?
     
  18. kennyc

    kennyc Inkling

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    I was interested in the number of sales - traditional vs ebook, which I think you answered close enough. I appreciate your information! Thanks!
     
  19. Philip Overby

    Philip Overby Staff Article Team

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    I just wanted to note that it's great to have someone with both self-publishing and traditional publishing experience here on the forum. It would be great to pick your brain for advice for both paths.

    I'm curious. Do you think your self-published works helped build your credentials towards getting a deal with Orbit?
     
  20. MichaelSullivan

    MichaelSullivan Maester

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    Oh without a doubt. The same book had been shopped to New York years ago...before self-publishing and didn't get so much as a nibble. My agent put together a proposal and sent it to 17 editors in New York and had 7 (or was it 8 don't recall) that immediately said they were interested. Orbit made a pre-emptive bid, and since they were our top pick we went with them (and they have proved to be a very good choice). All data I have indicates that a standard advance for a debut author is $5,000 -$10,000 a book so I should have gotten a $30,000 advance for my 3-book deal. But I actually received a six-figure advance which is much higher and I'm sure it is directly related to the success of the self-publishing.
     
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