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What are you Reading Now?

Discussion in 'Novels & Stories' started by Mythopoet, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. Chessie

    Chessie Guest

    Finished reading Dean Wesley Smith's "Writing Into The Dark". I feel completely rejuvenated and in touch with my artistic side lol. It's a great read and I'm glad to have gone through with the recommendation.
     
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  2. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    I feel like Elantris is never going to end...
     
  3. It will end with an early Brandon Sanderson special called the Brandonlanche. That book does move super slow for a long time. However, WoK and WoR are great.
     
  4. Russ

    Russ Istar

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    So I could bear no more of Black Company after 107 pages or so. Just too slow and too primitive for my tastes.

    Have switched up to Solomon Kane by Howard for entertainment and spent far too much getting a copy of Death is No Obstacle, but am really enjoying it.
     
  5. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    Blasphemer :D
     
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  6. Chessie

    Chessie Guest

    I bought two non-fic books today: "Hannah's Hope" by Jennifer Saake and Chris Fox's "Write To Market". Currently sinking my teeth into the second one. Also, I still have that turn of the century romance to read "The Lost Heiress". Guess I'll be busy this week.
     
  7. Incanus

    Incanus Auror

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    Reading Gormenghast (as in, book 2 of the series).

    Like the first book, this writing resonates with me in about the strongest way imaginable. It is not easy to describe. At the sentence level, it is breathtaking—totally unlike anything I can think of. Pretty much every sentence is a finely-wrought, highly individual, custom-cut gem. So much imagery and playful language per square inch—it’s unthinkable that someone actually pulled this off. My kind of thing all the way. Since this is the first of what will likely be many read-throughs, I’m going to savor it and soak it all in at a leisurely pace. Beauteous, astonishing, greatly entertaining, it belongs in a category unto itself. On the other hand, I think I can understand why some folks don't take to it. It may very well be one of those love it/hate it things.
     
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  8. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Moderator

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    I had the same reaction. Brilliant books.
     
  9. Devouring Wolf

    Devouring Wolf Troubadour

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    I'm reading The Left Hand of God by Paul Hoffman. So far, I'm really enjoying it.
     
  10. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Well, I finished Elantris some days ago. I found about half of it to be really good and compelling and the other half to be tedious and a bit too contrived. Every single chapter with Raoden was great. As a character I really loved him. Sarene was a good enough character, I liked her most when she interacted with Raoden. Hrathen was just really dull and honestly stupid. He was one of those characters that the story assures you over and over is a really smart, clever guy, really, honest, but everything he does goes wrong and every judgement he makes is wrong. I really had no respect for him as a character, despite the fact that the book kept trying to force it on me. I wish there had been less political intrigue and religious conflict but that's just a personal taste thing. Everything about the city of Elantris and the magic of it was really fascinating.

    I am also intrigued by reading a little about how Sanderson interconnects all the worlds in his various series. I'll probably have to give some of his other books a try at some point.

    In the meantime, I read The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald, which I've meant to do for a long time. It's one of those books that was very influential to early generations of fantasy writers including Tolkien. I can especially see how it was a major influence on the writing of The Hobbit.

    Feeling a bit burned out from trying lots of new things lately, I've decided to re-read The Lord of the Rings. This will be my first time reading it in ebook form and I am making good use of the highlighting feature. Reading LOTR feels like coming home after a long journey. Tolkien's writing is so full of his strong voice and even his most minor characters are so vivid in their dialogue. It is utterly delightful. It's been some years since I last read it but it's bringing home all my feelings and why Tolkien and Middle-earth will never truly have a peer.
     
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  11. Incanus

    Incanus Auror

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    Wow, Mythopoet, you've been a busy reader. Great!

    I've been wanting to read some G. MacDonald. Don't yet have any books by him, but I'll correct that situation some day. I've got Andrew Lang's Blue Fairy book on the radar as well.

    I've been sort of avoiding LOTR during my crucial early development as a writer--it already has too big an influence on me. On the other hand, there can be no question I'll be revisiting Middle-earth on and off for the rest of my days. The way I see it, it's about the closest thing to magic I'll ever find here in the mundane world.
     
  12. Tom

    Tom Istar

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    I just devoured the three books in Maggie Stiefvater's Raven Cycle, and now I'll have to wait for the last one to be released in April. :(

    I can honestly say that it's the best YA series I've read in...well, years. Maggie Stiefvater has this writing style that's...I don't know how to describe it. It's artful but it's almost savage. You feel like you could cut yourself on the edges of her sentences. Her characters are well-developed and distinctive, and their voices are so different it would be impossible to mistake them. I am a little disgruntled that one of my favorite characters hasn't gotten a POV chapter yet. Maybe Maggie's saving that for the last book.
     
  13. Ben

    Ben Troubadour

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    I'd never read George RR Martin's novellas, so I'm reading A Knight of the Seven Kigndoms - hoping the tone will subconsciously infuse the re-writes I'm working on. So far I found it a little less grim than ASOIAF.

    I'm also trying to support indie authors, so I'm simultaneously reading "the Thief Who Pulled on Trouble's Braids" by Michael McClung. About a quarter of the way into it and I can say it's very good - exactly what I was looking for right now.

    For a change of pace I've been sneaking in comedy short stories by Robert Bevans (another indie guy) - worth checking out if you've ever played D&D or other RPG's.
     
  14. Geo

    Geo Troubadour

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    The begging Place. Short novel from Ursula K. LeGuin. For me, the definition of urban fairy tale.
     
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  15. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    So last night I picked up Death Comes As An End by Agatha Christie (family drama/murder mystery set in ancient Egypt) for a little change of pace and ended up staying up until 1 am to finish it. IT WAS SO GOOD. I kept thinking I knew who the culprit was, but I was still surprised at the end. There was a nice thread of realistic romance in it too. HIGHLY recommended. Now I need to figure out if Christie did any other historical mysteries.
     
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  16. Chessie

    Chessie Guest

    RAWR! SHE'S MY ABSOLUTE FAVORITE!!!

    Ahem.

    If you need more recommendations, let me know. I've read all of her books lol. Her very first, And Then There Were None, is perhaps one of her best. She also wrote several novels under pen names, keep that in mind during your search. You rarely ever catch on to what she's doing which is so freaking awesome.

    So yea...I discovered some Scandinavian literature last night that I want to read but unfortunately English translations aren't available and I don't speak Swedish so...bummer. I did, however, come across Elizabeth Boyer's books on Amazon for like $0.01. Basically, I've been searching for fantasy books that are similar to what I write and there really aren't many modern ones. So I'm ordering some and seeing where it goes.
     
  17. Nimue

    Nimue Auror

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    Chester, you might want to try out The Sharing Knife books by Lois McMaster-Bujold. They're not something I would recommend to everyone, since they're much heavier on romance and everyday life than on epic plot, but I honestly love them. They take place in a fantasy setting that draws heavily from a pioneer atmosphere. The worldbuilding is really interesting and detailed. From what I know of your writing, there might be some overlap of interest there?
     
  18. Chessie

    Chessie Guest

    Noted. Thanks for the recommendation. You know how much I love pioneers ha!
     
  19. Nimue

    Nimue Auror

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    Ohh, they're so good. I wish I could read them for the first time again. xD


    As for me, I'm reading the Rai-Kirah Trilogy by Carol Berg. I loved Transformation--it kept me up until 4 am this weekend--but I felt like Revelation fell apart a bit. And oh my god, I wish poor Seyonne would just catch a break already. I mean, I like to torture my characters, but damn... Hoping the scattered plot is just due to the difficulties of Act II and that Restoration will pull a good finish.
     
  20. AndrewLowe

    AndrewLowe Troubadour

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    Mostly old Russian novels... In the middle of Crime and Punishment at the moment.
     
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