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Wondering- how many of you are looking for agents right now?

Discussion in 'Publishing' started by MAndreas, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. MAndreas

    MAndreas Troubadour

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    I was just wondering how many folks on here are actively looking for an agent, or plan to in the near future?
    I'm in the midst of the rejection circuit and wanted to know who else I can whine to ;).

    :alien:
     
  2. thetraveler

    thetraveler Minstrel

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    Well, I'm finishing up final draft work at the end of this month, then going to spend April editing and/or shuffling my story, and then starting the 1st of May, I am going to start sending in query letters.
     
  3. zizban

    zizban Troubadour

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    I didn't need an agent for my publisher so I guess I by-passed that.

    You can whine here. Just keep writing your next book while you wait for replies.
     
  4. pmkava

    pmkava Dreamer

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    who is your publisher and why didn't you need an agent? also is your publisher looking for writers?
     
  5. MAndreas

    MAndreas Troubadour

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    Cool thetraveler- good luck on wrapping it up! Thanks Zizban, but for me I am going the agent route- for now anyway ;) (although one of my books is currently under submission with a traditional publisher that ONLY looks at agented works...unless you meet them at a conference and they ask for it ;)). As for writing the next one, already there ;). I seem to be a writer-aholic...I always have at least one, usually two projects going in various levels of completion.

    pmkava- not sure who Zizban has but both TOR and Baen take non-agented subs.

    Ok, hopefully more "actively/future submitting" folks will pop up- venting and whining is good for the soul- and doing it on my blog isn't a good idea ;).
     
  6. zizban

    zizban Troubadour

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    My publisher is Booktrope. Booktrope is a small ebook publisher so an agent won't be of any help here. No money for them to make form it. Booktrope is closed to submissions right now
     
  7. zizban

    zizban Troubadour

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    Rikilamaro likes this.
  8. Telcontar

    Telcontar Staff Moderator

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    Been submitting for around a year now. :)

    Now giving serious thought to self-publishing the thing, what with how the ebook market is opening up.
     
  9. zizban

    zizban Troubadour

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    There are tons of ebook publishers. You can try Barking Rain Press: Barking Rain Press | Books with Bite!

    Many of the same people behind Virtual Tales run the place and I'd submit to them myself except I have to write four more books for Booktrope.
     
  10. MAndreas

    MAndreas Troubadour

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    Thanks Zizban- I had thought of checking out Absolute Write just for another resource. I currently use Query Tracker, Agent Query, and up until I cancelled it two months ago, Publisher's Market (and of course now I'm thinking I may re-up my PM account....$20 a month, but you do get to see what's going on "inside").

    For anyone interested, there is also a free Publisher's Lunch.
     
  11. Devor

    Devor Fiery Keeper of the Hat Moderator

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    What are the benefits of finding an epublisher over self-publishing online?
     
  12. Telcontar

    Telcontar Staff Moderator

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    The usual trade-offs I imagine. They take care of getting cover art done, book formatting, various other clerical tasks, for some percentage.
     
  13. The Dark One

    The Dark One Auror

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    The benefits are many, on one condition...that you use a quality epublisher.

    There is a vast ocean of self published work out there, some of it good, most of it less than good (or at least unrefined). Publishers, whether they be traditional publishers setting up ebook imprints, or new online only publishers, will style themselves as islands of quality in the vast ocean - places readers can come where they can expect a minimum level of authorial talent, editing and production values. And this will be the case as long as publishers exercise good judgment in their commissioning, have a proper editing process, invest in decent production values and have a good marketing budget. The minute they drop their standards, their island will become indistinguishable from the rest of teh ocean and will sink beneath the waves.

    The benefits for the writer are that your work will undergo a professional production process, will look really good, but most importantly...a lot more people will actually know it exists if you are with a decent publisher.
     
  14. MichaelSullivan

    MichaelSullivan Maester

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    Any "good publisher" will provide editing (both developmental and copy editing) a lot of the e-book only publishers are taking just about anything and putting it up "as is" which I think if they are going to do that - you might asw well self-publish. Industry standard for big-six is 25% to author, 75% kept by them. The small e-publishers usually are doing better with a 40/60 or 50/50 split. To translate a book from manuscript to ebook is super simple (can be learned in an afternoon and takes about 1 - 2 hours per book). Cover designs can be found for $150 - $250. So if all they are going to do is translate, make a cover and post - it's not worth giving them half the profits. But...if they are going to do marketing and editing - then yeah I suggest going with them.
     
    Devor likes this.
  15. MichaelSullivan

    MichaelSullivan Maester

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    Back on topic...I had an agent who shopped my books for about a year. Her husband became ill and she left the business. I then went to a small press - so didn't need an agent. Once I started getting foreign offers I got an agent specifically for my foreign language deals and then as the books gained in popularity I asked her if she wanted to represent in the US and she did.

    Since then my agent has negotiated:
    • A six-figure US deal
    • Elven foreign language deals
    • Bookclub versions
    • Audio versions
    • Got me a media agent for TV/movie rights (head of book-to-film division of ICM)

    Some say not to use agents, just use an IP lawyer, but my agent works at finding new revenue sources for my works (such as game developers) whereas an IP lawyer will review the contract in front of them, but they aren't out there finding new gigs for your writing.
     
  16. zizban

    zizban Troubadour

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    I am too lazy and/or not talented enough to self publish. I have, but only a short story. Let someone else do the work.
     
  17. Rikilamaro

    Rikilamaro Inkling

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    I'm in the thinking about finding an agent stage. :) Go ahead and whine, it's good for the soul!
     
  18. Lewis.Keating

    Lewis.Keating Acolyte

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    I just recently published my first fantasy novel in paperback. A helpful tip I received when it comes to finding an agent is to publish your work any way you can. eBooks, self-publishing, small independent publishers, etc. This way you build a “Writer’s Resume” and you will have a piece of work to showcase to any potential agent. Plus your hard work and dedication to your story will be reflected by you and help motivate the agent to assist an any way possible.
     
  19. I believe we may be going back to an earlier mode, when it comes to agents.

    For the last decade or so, the normal path has been "find an agent, who then tries to sell your book"; otherwise, you had to "settle" for a small press.

    But it's gotten harder and harder to get an agent these days. Agents are forcing incredibly nasty contracts on writers. I don't know a single writer who's been working consistently over the last twenty years without at least one story of an agent who exploited or tried to exploit them.

    That's the result of agents becoming a "mandatory" part of the process. Whenever a profession which is unlicensed, unregulated, has no special training required, and no oversight of any sort becomes "mandatory" to an industry, you have the potential for issues. Literary agents today have those issues in spades.

    But I see things improving. Writers don't need agents to self publish and earn a decent living. Now, suddenly, agents need writers more than writers need agents. Which is how things ought to be, really.

    So I see things shifting back toward the old standard, where agents were people highly successful writers hired to help them manage the business end of their career once they business got too complex for them to easily manage on their own.

    My wild-ass guess for the future looks something like this:
    - All writers will start off self publishing or publishing through some sort of "collective" that vaguely resembles a small press.
    - Writers who achieve high levels of success this way will hire agents to help them manage rights sales to other venues.
    - Publishers who survive will have radically different skill-sets from what we see today, and will be experts at taking writers who have already built successful fan bases and taking them to the "next level" through mass marketing, media exposure, and a powerful focus on marketing to readers.
     
  20. MAndreas

    MAndreas Troubadour

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    LOL! Thanks Rikilamaro. WHINE!!! Sorry, just getting annoyed at the "non responders" (aka agents for whom designing a bot softwware to even send out a form "no thanks email" is too much- so they just don't respond. I was doing my subs in waves (to keep my sanity) and wanted to wait until I'd heard from all of my first wave....two frelling non-responders are on there.

    Of course I could just be stalling to hold off sending more submissions....nah ;).
     

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