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How can I get an extreme fluffy writing style?

Discussion in 'Writing Discussions' started by Writer’s_Magic, May 21, 2018.

  1. Yeah! I know, what you are going to say, “Write! Read! And practice!”. I did it, and I didn’t stop to do it yet. But it doesn’t work. However, a fluffy writing style is important. The reader doesn’t want eyesore because you wrote too many words. So, do you have other tips than what I wrote and always look for the simplest.
     
  2. Svrtnsse

    Svrtnsse Staff Article Team

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    So, I have to admit that I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "fluffy writing style" so I don't have any specific advice on how to achieve that. However, I wrote an article a while back about Writer's Voice, in which I explain what I did in order to try and develop my own voice. It's here: Writer's Voice — What It Is, and How to Find It

    The short summary of it might be something along the lines of:
    1. Identify what defines the style you want to achieve.
    2. Experiment with incorporating those elements in your own writing.

    EDIT: It's important to note that this is about what worked for me. It may not work for you, or for anyone else at all.
     
  3. SvrtnsseSvrtnsse I mean by this a style, which makes reading easy and as fast as a rocket. You know. Something, which tells everything you want to tell, but not in eyesore style.
     
  4. Svrtnsse

    Svrtnsse Staff Article Team

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    Okay, so what I'd do is I'd try and think of some books that felt to me like they were written in a style like that. I'd try and analyse what made it so. Is there some specific property of the prose that makes if faster to read, and what property is that? Can I replicate it in my own writing, and does it work for me?
     
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  5. pmmg

    pmmg Auror

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    I don't think I have ever come across a fluffy writing style before. I think you mean a smooth and free flowing style of prose.

    If I may, it does not appear to me that English is your first language (I think the we discussed that before), and so you have an uphill battle trying to write in a non-native language.

    I could give you some pointers, but thing is, writing style first has to come from your own natural voice. If it is not flowing from inside, then it is already cutting against the grain. You need to pick up an inner ear for what matters and what does not. Go after important details and leave off those that don't. I think the best advice has already been given. Find someone who is doing what you want to see from yourself and study it for all the behind the text stuff that is making it work for you. I really don't think any pointers I would give would really be of use, cause you don't start off with my inner voice. I further think, it just will never do to try to skip to the end of a journey, the journey just wont let you.

    For what its worth, something I have cultivated in my own writing that would lend itself along the lines of the flow of the prose would be

    1) I rarely use words longer than 3 syllables.
    2) I use what I sometimes call a rule of three. Three details and move on.
    3) Use long and short sentences to punch in the ideas you would like to stand out.
    4) Repeat thoughts and words to hammer them in.
    5) Sometimes I notice alliteration and use it for impact.
    6) Setup a template for a sentence and use it to make all its pieces stronger.

    I have an idea, you find something that you think is written in a style you would like to adopt, and post it up. We'll see if we can pick out the pieces that make it work.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2018
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  6. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    >I don't think I have ever come across a fluffy writing style before.

    upload_2018-5-21_12-26-10.png

    Been waiting years to use this
     

    Attached Files:

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  7. pmmg

    pmmg Auror

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    Some things are worth waiting for.
     
  8. Simulacrum

    Simulacrum Dreamer

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    Lots of good advice in this thread. Read authors whose prose you admire. Pay special attention to the way they use language. But as pmmg noted, it all springs from your own voice.
     
  9. Raelynd Drake

    Raelynd Drake New Member

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    It would also help to have beta readers after your edited draft. A lot of things we get hang up on end up not mattering to the readers. Beta readers will let you know if your work is too wordy or just the right amount of wordy.
     
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  10. Rebekkah V.

    Rebekkah V. Acolyte

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    I find it helpful to read your text aloud. You notice the flow of your sentences, identify wordy passages and passages you can cut without remorse because they just don't fit in the flow. But that's for revision. Until then, I would stick to the advice the others have given you.

    Finding your own voice isn't easy. It's a continuous process of improving and trying out what works and what not. And it changes over time. In ten years, your writing might have changed completely compared to how you write now.
     
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  11. Simulacrum

    Simulacrum Dreamer

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    Funny that you mention that because I recently took a look at something I wrote in 2002 and it’s much different from what I’d produce now. Back then I was obsessed with trying to imitate my favorite novelist. Nowadays I don’t try to imitate anyone.

    I’ve noticed some of my favorite writers have much different voices now than they did at the beginning of their careers as well. It’s natural to evolve.
     
  12. Rebekkah V.

    Rebekkah V. Acolyte

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    Same here. Worse, I was convinced that it was absolutely cool to write like this. LOL. Fortunately, after a while, I grew annoyed with certain phrases the writer I copied used a lot, and my voice developed a life of its own.

    Yes it is. And it's always encouraging to see that other writers are making the same journey.
     
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