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How to write good poems.

Post your strategy when writing good poetry.
Elaborate on the factors that you use in poetry, such as themes and ambience.
How does the name of the poem relate to the content?
How does each line relate to the previous or the next?
How do the words that rhyme relate to each other and the content of the poem?

As for me, I enjoy writing poems.
As for factors, themes and ambience, I often choose something unique and or interesting.
Choosing a good name is important, choose a name that relates to all parts of your poem.
Or choose a name for the poem that resonates.
Each line must be important, try to make each line relate the next.
Rhymes can be made to relate to each other, or perhaps to the content of the poem when combined.
I use these strategies and they seem to work well.

Writing resources.
 

Incanus

Auror
Well, I don't have an answer as to how to write GOOD poetry. I've dabbled a little with poems and songs, but not enough to get really good at it.

I'll take a look at that link a little later, if I can---

One thing I sometimes try to do is to use the title and opening to suggest a certain topic, but then pull a fast one and alter the meaning of it all. Here's something written in free verse I did probably 7 or 8 years ago that is an example of that. It's pretty short.



GARBAGE


Garbage
Everywhere junk
Piles in front of me
And piles in the distance

But this garbage is new
Unopened
Shrink-wrapped
And displayed in towering stacks

This garbage thrives and multiplies
Forming a ponderous maze
Even as I seek a way out
It grows larger and reshapes itself

I crawl forth, but in vain

Will the mess ever get cleaned up?
 

pmmg

Myth Weaver
Generally, when I am writing poetry, I am writing it for a less than serious work. Sometimes, I write poem as a way to bring in a puzzle into a story. But Poetry is not my thing. While I feel I have a good understanding of what poems are supposed to be, I don't often go after writing something that is meant to strongly evoke things in others (in poetry form).

Given your strong interest in Poetry, I wonder if you would not find a more kindred crowd on a site more dedicated to poetry.

Here is one below:
https://allpoetry.com/

In direct answer to your questions:

Post your strategy when writing good poetry.

Since poetry itself is a work of art, I go through a process like:

Having something I want to say, and a reason for saying it
Deciding on the form
Getting it written
Going back and addressing issues of rhyme and rhythm
Reaching for the stars a little in word choices.
And done.

Elaborate on the factors that you use in poetry, such as themes and ambience.

I think I would have to write more poetry to have an answer to this. Since most of my poems are meant to be fun and playful, I guess fun.

How does the name of the poem relate to the content?

Naming a poem for me comes from the same place names for other story elements come from. I just pick what seems to capture its essence the best. (Or fret over it again and again if I cant find the right one).


How does each line relate to the previous or the next?

I like to have a logical flow, and have it all relate. There is usually a narrative that runs through it as well.


How do the words that rhyme relate to each other and the content of the poem?

Well, that's kind of the whole game. Does it rhyme, does it fit in the rhythm, does it relate, and does it evoke? I'd say, I aim for this as much as possible, unless, for some reason, I am writing something more freeform.


Thanks for the Article. I think it is a good write up of my general understanding.
 
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Brimstone

New Member
I don't know how to write good poems, yet I've won some poetry contests. Sometimes when I thought my poem was good, no one liked it. Other times I thought it garbage and it won. I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to poetry, but tying too hard to use a formula can go wrong sometimes.

Ropes lie torn in utter shreds
By sharp claws of grand intent
Musings freed of binding threads
E'er delectable as they went
 
Create a unique rhyme structure with a interesting poetic theme, make each line of the poem represent the others.
 

Karlin

Troubadour
The few bits of poetry I've written have been deliberate imitations of certain styles. Either classic Chinese poetry (as best as I can manage, not knowing Chinese), or, in one odd case, a rewriting of part of the epic of Gilgamesh, to include Monkey
 

Demesnedenoir

Myth Weaver
I studied English Lit and read way too much poetry, and still, this is my favorite poem ever:

I have a buddy
my buddy is a toad
he is kind of muddy
and flat on the road.

But he is my buddy, my buddy to stay,
until he dries up and blows away.


—Garfield the Cat

So! I might not be the best person to ask. I've had that memorized since high school. Don't ask me to quote another poem in its entirety—except, of course, this winner that I wrote in 10 seconds in high school because I forgot to write the assignment.

Man kills; hell fills.
 
Then the young ones, eager still,
Kept their places ‘round, until
The Hag, who tended mead and fire,
Spoke again, to their desire,
By telling hidden ways to see
The way the world, tho’ subtle, be:

“This is how the Heaven's show,
What e’er they, ever watching, know
From high above, what friend or foe,
Has chance to greet you here below.

Sun and stars for common men,
Lord and child, or kith and kin.

Gentle rain for those in want,
Those in love, and those in thought.

Cruelest winds bring wand'ring souls;
In from elsewhere, quick to go.

Of clouded day or night, beware;
Those that hunt find darkness fair.

Stay near to hearth and fire, my child,
When moon is bright, or storm is wild;
By gods and gold, by blood and oak;
Leave storm and moon to stranger folk."

— The Book of Nilga, The Hag Dialogues, excerpt.

---

The working title of my book is "Stranger Folk." Depending on whether or not that remains the title, this bit may or may not stay in it.
 
The few bits of poetry I've written have been deliberate imitations of certain styles. Either classic Chinese poetry (as best as I can manage, not knowing Chinese), or, in one odd case, a rewriting of part of the epic of Gilgamesh, to include Monkey
The class does not tire of Sun Pilgrim. Don't hold back now.
 
Write your poem with twists and turns, and combine these twists and turns with a theme that compliments them.
Add a character for fun.
Make the characters personality blend in with the poem.
 
Choose a theoretical animal to write about.
This animal could be a tropical animal such as a tropical bird.
Or a desert animal such as a desert owl.
Perhaps your animal could be a bug such as a pink firefly.
 
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