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What are you Reading Now?

Discussion in 'Novels & Stories' started by Mythopoet, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. Harry Potter And The Order Of The Pheonix
     
  2. FifthView

    FifthView Istar

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    I finally started reading the Dresden books, with Storm Front.

    About to begin chapter eight, and...is it me, or would you advise beginning to write a new fantasy mega-series about a wizard and waiting until chapter six, book one, to even show him doing magic?

    I've been told/read that the first couple Dresden books are slow/boring compared to others. I think this might be true? It feels like it only started picking up about chapter 6 (wonder why) through chapter 7.
     
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  3. Vermivorax

    Vermivorax New Member

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    I just finished reading (well, listening to) Rosanne A. Brown's A Song of Wraiths and Ruin. It was very good and I'd been looking forward to it ever since I read the blurb. The characters have all kinds of secret motivations that put them into conflict with one another and the West African setting is pretty neat.
     
  4. Eduardo Letavia

    Eduardo Letavia Minstrel

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    Currently reading a non-fiction historical book about the Visigoths. It tells their story from their migration from what is now Scandinavia, through their relationship with the Roman empire, their power struggles, and the last kingdom they founded in Spain before falling prey to the islamic invasion of the Iberian peninsula in the VIII century CE. Truly a time of wars and murder of kings!

    And just before that, I finished a "The Hainish novels and stories" anthology by Ursula K. Le Guin. Interesting stuff, anthropological scifi with some fantasy brushes (in the first stories at least).
     
  5. neodoering

    neodoering Minstrel

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    And just before that, I finished a "The Hainish novels and stories" anthology by Ursula K. Le Guin. Interesting stuff, anthropological scifi with some fantasy brushes (in the first stories at least).[/QUOTE]

    You might try Ursula LeGuin's work, Always Coming Home. It too is an anthropological work, set in the near future when our society has collapsed and small communities struggle to survive on the Pacific coast.
     
  6. Eduardo Letavia

    Eduardo Letavia Minstrel

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    Good to know, thanks for the reference!
     
  7. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Woah, thanks for mentioning this. I've ready "Semley's Necklace" in a short story collection and really enjoyed it. Didn't know there was more! I have to read these now.
     
  8. Eduardo Letavia

    Eduardo Letavia Minstrel

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    Yes, there's MUCH more. For starters, Semley's Necklace is just a part of a longer novella called Rocannon's World, which is the first story of them all. The anthology I've read is this one by The Library of America, complete with some introductions, articles and notes (even maps) by Le Guin herself. Be aware that she wrote all these stories in a wide time interval, starting in 1966 up till 2000, so you'll notice an evolution in the style, themes and some lack of internal coherence among them.
     
  9. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    I have fond memories of Rocannon's World. It was in an Ace paperback, in the day when they would publish two novellas in a single volume, reversed. One cover on the front, the other on the back. You can see the format here
    [​IMG]

    The other story is The Kar-Chee Reign by Avram Davidson, part of another classic series.

    I haven't seen this cover in a long time. It looks terrible cheesy now, and the blurb at the top isn't much better. Gee, thanks, publisher, you sure earned your percentage there!
     
  10. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Auror

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    Life is a most curious thing. I used to hate e-books and now I am reading more e-books than normal books.

    Anyway, finished "Lessons Learned from the Use of the Machine Gun during the Russo-Japanese War" and "Russian soldier vs Japanese soldier: Manchuria 1904-05".

    I think that for my own sake its better to not try to predict what I will read but instead just, read whatever I feel like and is interested in at the moment. I wish I could plan better but apparently I can't.
     
  11. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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  12. Hir i-Chorvath

    Hir i-Chorvath Archmage

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    I've recently finished Sunbolt and Memories of Ash. I thought they were pretty good, they were different. Both were written using first-person PoV and in present tense.
    Also the Phoenix Host, it was an interesting read but not one of my favorites.

    Still, waiting for the seventh book in the City Between Series, due to come out in September-October. If you haven't read it, I highly recommend it. Also, Rhythm of War is coming out in November and I can't wait to read it! Again, I highly recommend it.
     
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  13. Insolent Lad

    Insolent Lad Inkling

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    I'm reading Puck of Pook's Hill. Somehow, despite being a Kipling fan (I consider The Jungle Books to be a formative childhood experience) I had missed this one, maybe because it is a 'children's book.' Anyway, I hadn't known how much it influenced Tolkien. Puck, physically, is a hobbit, right down to his hairy feet! But there is much more of him in the character of Tom Bombadil, another old one who has lingered in the world of men.
     
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  14. kennyc

    kennyc Inkling

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    I've 'discovered' Haruki Murakami ... wow! (a few short stories previously) .. Wind Up Bird and Kafka on the Shore.... Wow!
     
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  15. Silvahkir

    Silvahkir Dreamer

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    I recently started studying modern poetry. As I meditated on T.S Eliot and Yeats, I realized that I should go back and read the foundational texts. I am already familiar with the Hebrew scriptures, from of narrative and poetry perspective, so now I am going back to the Iliad. I do a good bit of flitting about though, and am interested in how poetry is woven into narratives like the Dragon Age games, Skyrim, and of course I have to mention Lord of the Rings.
     
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  16. Insolent Lad

    Insolent Lad Inkling

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    I've started on 'The Wood Beyond the World' by William Morris, a novel which it could be argued was the very first 'modern fantasy,’ written well before Tolkien, or even Dunsany. Certainly, world building as we know it now started there--the first self-contained, quasi-medieval, and completely invented fantasy world. I read the Ballantine edition way back; I was probably in my twenties. I’m going through the (free) ebook from Project Gutenberg now.
     
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  17. 1984 by George Orwell and Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.
     
  18. Insolent Lad

    Insolent Lad Inkling

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    What with it being its hundredth anniversary of publication, I reread David Lindsay's 'A Voyage to Arcturus.' Maybe the first novel of 'literary fantasy' ever. It's certainly chock-full of 'ideas,' but manages to be a decent story anyway.
     
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  19. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Auror

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    Pretty much unrelated to what I want to write, I am reading my way through the 8th edition codices for Warhammer 40 000 in regards to Space Marines.
     
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  20. Redwall-Brian Jaques
     
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