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What are you Reading Now?

skip.knox

toujours gai, archie
Moderator
Now reading Nutmeg of Consolation by Patrick O'Brian, The Greek Coffin Case by Ellery Queen, and Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold. Recently read A Fortress in the Eye of Time by C.J. Cherryh.
 
Good Omens, by Pratchett and Gaiman. It's one of the few Pratchett novels I hadn't read, and so far I love it. It has all the quirky-ness and all the humor as a form of social commentary in a lighthearted but very much to the point sort of way that so far I have only found in Pratchett's works. The type of humor and writing very much fits with the earlier discworld novels like Guards Guards! So if you enjoyed those, give it a go :)
 
Good Omens, by Pratchett and Gaiman. It's one of the few Pratchett novels I hadn't read, and so far I love it. It has all the quirky-ness and all the humor as a form of social commentary in a lighthearted but very much to the point sort of way that so far I have only found in Pratchett's works. The type of humor and writing very much fits with the earlier discworld novels like Guards Guards! So if you enjoyed those, give it a go :)
I love Terry Pratchett. I do need to buy some of his books sometime.
 

CupofJoe

Myth Weaver
The Silver Pigs by Lindsey Davis
Not a fantasy but an enjoyable who-done-it romp through Rome of AD70.
The plot in part at least has to do with stolen silver and who might be responsible....
 

Reaver

Staff
Moderator
I'm currently reading "The Legend of Drizzt" (25th Anniversary Edition), Book II by the incomparable R.A. Salvatore. Book two is comprised of three outstanding tales: The Crystal Shard, Streams of Silver and The Halfling's Gem.
 

CupofJoe

Myth Weaver
Terry Pratchett presents Mrs Bradshaw's Handbook
A good pastiche of the real Bradshaw railway guides with just enough Discworld whimsy to make it fun to read.
 

Stevie

Minstrel
Just started "The Moonsteel Crown" by Stephen Deas. It has all the makings of a cracker of a grimdark tale, though the voices of the characters come across as very modern, sometimes dangerously close to tongue in cheek. And some sloppy editing, which just gets me all riled up for no good reason.

Non-fiction re-read is "The Talent Code" by Daniel Coyle. A remarkable book for anyone interested in where talent and skills come from. I'm trying to figure out how its premise of 'deep practice' works for fiction writing.
 

kennyc

Inkling
I just devoured Three Elizabeth Strout books! I read the short story 'Signs' in The Story Prize winners....that took me to "Anything Can Happen" in which 'Signs' is the opening story of a set of linked stories and then back to the Pulitzer winner "Olive Kitteridge" followed by "Olive Again" - these are all sets of linked short stories set is the same small town and they are WONDERFUL. She is a master of third person Omniscient viewpoint! jumping seamlessly from one inner thought to another and never a bit of confusion!

Elizabeth Strout
 

Miles Lacey

Maester
Prudence: The Custard Protocol: Book One by Gail Carriger. The tone is so pompous that i could be forgiven it was written in the Victorian Era! It is a steampunk novel with vampires, werewolves and an unhealthy obsession with female bloomers.

Just finished reading Tom Sharpe's Wilt. Truly one of the most funniest novels I've read and you'll never look at community college lecturers or pork sausages quite the same way again.

The Doomsday Ultimatum by James Follett was okay but very dated. Interesting twist at the end, though.
 
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