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What are you Reading Now?

Discussion in 'Novels & Stories' started by Mythopoet, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    What a shame. Those works are for grownups, not kids. We do this sort of thing far too often in public education. I doubt I'd have given you anything Greek at that age, but if I did, it'd be Aristophanes.
     
    Thomas Laszlo likes this.
  2. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    I'm reading Call for the Dead, the origin story for George Smiley (John Le Carré). Le Carré is always reliable. This one has some lovely plot twists. He does a brilliant job of giving us the MC as an utterly uninteresting character (toad-like) moving through an uninteresting world, and then bam! an inexplicable murder drops in his lap. And whoop! there are oblique references to a beautiful lost love. How did the toad win a princess? Le Carré is also a master of giving us so many clues we can't winnow out which ones are significant. All served with a generous dollop of British post-war cynicism.
     
    Thomas Laszlo likes this.
  3. Thomas Laszlo

    Thomas Laszlo Sage

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    Aristophanes is good! I haven’t read all but I enjoyed the parts I’ve seen so far. I’m currently way ahead on reading level so I’ve been picking up some classic Greek literature. My next is Republic by Plato and to finish five of his Dialogues. Then it’s on to Sophocles with Oedipus.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. I've got an amazon cart full of books and two video games, and no budget. I keep wanting new books to read!
     
  5. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    I picked up a volume that had Agatha Christie's A Mysterious Affair at Styles and Curtain (the first and last Poirot stories) at the thrift store and read both of those. Curtain seems to be fairly acclaimed, but I thought it was pretty poor. There just wasn't enough Poirot since he was an invalid who stayed in his room at Styles almost constantly and so did no actual detecting, instead just waiting to hear reports from Hastings (forget his first name) every night as to what happened all day. That left the majority of the narrative as Hastings bumbling around and being profoundly stupid. Just didn't work for me. Especially as at this time Hastings has apparently been Poirot's partner in solving several mysteries in the past. And yet he's constantly doubting Poirot's ability and sanity. That works ok in their first story together, but not in the last.

    I am now reading The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers. Which FINALLY came down below $11-12 as an ebook. I've been awaiting this day. I read the book years ago from the library and it really had a huge impact on me and set my feet on the path to creating my current world. I've wanted to buy it as an ebook for ages now but couldn't get myself to spend that much. And it's even better than I remembered. In true Tim Powers fashion there's a lot of strange supernatural stuff thrown together in a really interesting way that you don't expect.
     
    Chessie2 likes this.
  6. Svrtnsse

    Svrtnsse Staff Article Team

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    Finally got around to picking up Save The Cat and got through the introduction earlier. Now on to the rest.
     
    Chessie2 likes this.
  7. I'm working my way through several Discworld books.
     
  8. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    I'm trying to read Doctor Zhivago but it's proving a tough slog. Two things stand out. One, I'm about 15% in and I still can't find the main character. Pasternak jumps from character to character, location to location, even within chapters, with no apparent logic to it. I've seen the Zhivago name a couple of times, but have yet to meet the actual Doctor. This has the cumulative effect of having me not care about anyone in the story.

    The second thing is what I might call emotional lurches. Characters will be talking about this or that, maybe a disagreement or a hope, and the language suddenly, almost instantly, goes hyperbolic. The rhetoric is so overwrought it sounds almost comical. In theater we would call it chewing the scenery. And there again, the cumulative effect is that I don't really care about any of it because the author has not led me to those emotional highs or lows but merely throws them at me.

    I really, really want to like the book (never saw the movie). I love the time period, but not loving the author.
     
  9. Incanus

    Incanus Archmage

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    I'm reading a collection of stories by Arthur Machen. So far, it is most excellent. It's sort of a nice blend of Edgar Allen Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The writing has an easy flow to it - good quality stuff.
     
  10. Mytherea

    Mytherea Minstrel

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    Reading a selection of Sherlock Holmes short stories and The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley.
     
  11. Russ

    Russ Istar

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    Just finished reading a great history book- "Praetorian." I find stuff like this very useful for my writing. Not only does it deal with real organizational and economic problems, but after I read it I always find the crazy political stuff I have come up with for my work so much more believable because of the absolutely insane stuff that is historical fact.
     
  12. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Ah, what stories? I've read several by him.
     
  13. Incanus

    Incanus Archmage

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    It's a 2011 Penguin collection called 'The White People and Other Weird Stories'. It's got 11 tales all together. I just started the title story earlier today. I'm enjoying this collection so far.

    Kind of makes me want to seek out some Algernon Blackwood...
     
  14. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Archmage

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    I'm taking a break from the Iliad, as I might have written above, and is slogging through two non-fiction books "The Other Greeks" and "Buddhist Cosmology". But luckily I've got Tad Williams' Osten Ard series, both of them, waiting for me and the first books of the two series "Narbonne Inheritance" and "The Accuser Kings" soon coming to my by mail.

    After the non-fiction, its all fiction again. Starting with finishing the Iliad. :D
     
  15. CupofJoe

    CupofJoe Myth Weaver

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    Just started of Don Quixote, a 1906 translation.
    I'm still on the Introduction - its 34 pages long!
    Someone here may have inspired me to read it....
     
  16. Russ

    Russ Istar

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    While I doubt I inspired you to read it, I commend your choice. Great book.
     
  17. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Finished The Celtic Twilight by W. B. Yeats, which I've continued reading in between other things. It's basically a collection of observations and conversations Yeats had with various rural Irish folk while traveling the countryside. Much of it is related in his own voice and has a very informal feel to it. It's like sitting down with him by the fireside and having him tell stories about all the people he's met and places he's been. And really, it was beautiful and very insightful and I loved it.
     
  18. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Kwaidan by Lafcadio Hearn. A collection of "weird" Japanese folk tales. Though as far as Japanese stories go, these ones aren't very "weird" in the way we use the term these days. Still very entertaining though. Plenty of stories I haven't read before.

    Also The Lost Continent (also published as Beyond Thirty) by Edgar Rice Burroughs. A worn out old paperback given to me by a man from the local Burroughs Society at the recent local SF convention I went to. I've only just started it but the premise is interesting. After the Great War (WWI) the eastern and western hemispheres get completely cut off from each other for over 200 years. The western hemisphere is the home of peace and prosperity; no one knows what's become of the east. The protag unwittingly ends up over there and adventure ensues.
     
  19. I'm reading The Great Cosmic Mother, by Barbara Moor. It's a fascinating read, partially about ancient matriarchal ways of life, and partially about how the left-brained, fundamentalist, domineering patriarchal society formed, and how it affects the world today.
     
  20. Chessie2

    Chessie2 Staff Article Team

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    Started the Silver Gryphon by Mercedes Lackey last night. My mother-in-law got me books 2 and 3 of the series. It's strange starting a series on book 2 but it's somewhat of a mystery as to what's going on. And of course, Lackey is my fave. :D
     
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