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What are you Reading Now?

Discussion in 'Novels & Stories' started by Mythopoet, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. Yzjdriel

    Yzjdriel Acolyte

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    Currently re-reading the code I'm testing tomorrow.
    Also reading Grandma's Pączki recipe - well, trying to. Polish diacritical marks and her cursive never went well together, I'm afraid.
     
    CupofJoe likes this.
  2. I'm technically in the middle of like 5 books and my Goodreads shows more than that because i've abandoned several and haven't taken them down.

    I really dislike a lot of YA. I absolutely hate the one generic voice and style it is all written in, mainly. They sound more and more the same with every passing month. There are good ones but it's hard to come upon them. But my library doesn't have any of the sequels I want to read. not a single one of scott lynch's books there, city of stairs is just there bereft of its sequels, not a single first book in any of brandon sanderson's series is ever there (idk if he's any good or not i havent had the opportunity to find out), i've been searching for the sequel to annihilation for half a year, but it's never there. I waited months and months for gardens of the moon to show up and now deadhouse gates has been absent for like 5 months. How? If you can consistently have 4 copies of twilight on the shelves you can keep one book of literally any good series, YA or otherwise, cant you? but no

    My local library's general fiction section is like 6 rows of shelves thats mostly christian romance novels. It's bad. Very, very bad. No fantasy novel that is even a little bit off the beaten path, except some weird arthurian stuff i have no interest in. The young adult section is, admittedly, rather robust, and i find myself bringing home and rejecting YA books over and over. Almost nothing on my TBR is even there if it's not YA. I don't have the money to buy things just so I can see if I like them, or buy them at all, and i'm sure as hell not buying just the second book in a series.

    Basically nothing I'm reading right now is doing it for me and I'm just going to sit here and...try to survive it I guess

    Honestly if good books weren't so uncommon...
     
    Tom likes this.
  3. honestly i'm not sure how YA is such a huge category because you can read 5 of em published in the past 5 years and you have a pretty good chance of having read almost everything published in the same time span. Is the category held up by people who *habitually* buy YA? How do you even???

    This current epoch is almost worse than when all those shitty dystopians were getting published in the wake of the hunger games. Now the thing is queens, and there are dozens of barely distinguishable books about girls having to take back their thrones. Usually at least two female POV's. Girl is always a badass fighter. Generic fantasy world. Two or three fantasy creatures. Something something forbidden magic. Something empire. Bland court intrigue. It's not anything like with the hunger games where dystopia was everywhere, it's the same plotline over and over, not just the same tropes.
     
  4. Azeroth

    Azeroth Dreamer

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    I am slogging my way through the Wheel of Time, currently on #5 -- The Fires of Heaven. I aim to complete the entire series by the end of the year.
     
  5. CupofJoe

    CupofJoe Vala

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    Espedair Street by Ian Banks. Not a fantasy, but maybe a modern Fairytale.
     
  6. Svrtnsse

    Svrtnsse Staff Article Team

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    Currently reading The Tattooed Wolf, by K Bannerman. It's categorized as Paranormal / Dark Fantasy / Low Fantasy, but I'm not sure it fits what I would commonly associate with any of that.

    Either way, the story is about a divorce lawyer.
    One day a man comes in for an appointment. The man claims to be a werewolf and asks that the lawyer represents his wife in their upcoming divorce proceedings. He also claims his wife tried to kill him, twice.

    I picked it up thinking it would help me better nail down what categories my own book would fit in. I'm not sure my story really matches this one, but it's still enjoyable. Not sure what category I'd put it in myself though. :p
     
  7. CupofJoe

    CupofJoe Vala

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    We had a family friend that made Pączki for holidays and birthdays. My mouth still waters at the thought of them.
     
  8. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    I'll pray for you. ;)
     
    Ned Marcus likes this.
  9. Azeroth

    Azeroth Dreamer

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    Ha, I am actually taking a break from the WoT at the moment. It is very overwhelming.

    I finished Fires of Heaven and am now reading something different. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson.
     
  10. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Ok so I finished Tolkien's Letters a while back. It was difficult getting to the end of his life, especially the letters from after Edith died. And his death came so suddenly, right after he wrote a very normal letter to his daughter about the vacation he was on. But wow, did I learn a lot from reading his own thoughts in his own words. What a remarkable man.

    After that I read Lord of Light which was amazing. On one hand I wish I had read it long ago but on the other hand would I have been ready to truly appreciate it? Zelazny's writing is just so smooth and evocative. I really need to read more of it and it looks like his works are FINALLY being turned into ebooks so it'll be easier to.

    I started a new manga called Takane and Hana and binged right through all 7 volumes currently in English. It's an absolutely hilarious romantic comedy. One of the few that has made me literally burst out loud into laughter many times. The banter between the main couple is just utterly delightful.

    Then I picked up Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters on sale. I had never read anything by this author before (though I understand she's quite beloved) and I don't read a lot of normal historical fiction but I have a deep love of Egyptian archeology so I couldn't resist. It was quite good. I liked the female main character quite a lot. I'll have to pick up more in this series eventually.
     
  11. skip.knox

    skip.knox toujours gai, archie Moderator

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    Currently reading another O'Brian novel (vol. 11). His prose is a consistent pleasure, though I rather fear the second half of the book is going to teach me far more about English law courts in the Napoleonic era than I ever would care to know. :) But I do enjoy the characters and the writing.

    It is such a relief after trying once again to read N.K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season. Never mind the present tense and even the occasional use of the second person, both utterly pointless as far as I can see. It's the storytelling itself that puts me off. Arbitrary references to things that are both inconsequential and unexplained. Actions that have no discernible motivation, or else have them pasted on like a travel stickers on luggage. Social structures that seem to exist solely to serve the plot. This is my third run at it and I've got no further than 16%. I do not understand why so many people are so enthusiastic. Switching over to O'Brian was like walking out of a 19thc factory floor into bright sunlight and fresh air. I don't think I'll go back in there.

    Also dabbling along with P.C. Hodgell's God Stalker Chronicles. It's a bit wooden, but still a step up from Jemisin, and is a nice break from O'Brian now and again.
     
  12. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Archmage

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    Finally started with Tolstoy's "The Cossacks" and we'll see how this goes.
     
  13. kennyc

    kennyc Inkling

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    Just finished Listening to my first Audio Book .... I've tried a few in the past and just couldn't do it. I definitely prefer print/ebook ... still convenient to listen while walking (which I've been doing a lot of lately about 10 miles/day and often read my kindle books)

    100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    Totally trippy magical realism generational family saga. Ending was about as I expected....wonderful book from the late 60's :)
     
  14. neodoering

    neodoering Minstrel

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    It's fun to read these posts and see what others are reading. Today I am lamenting the closure of Borders Books, back when I had a bookstore one block from my apartment. The media was saying Barnes & Noble was going to go under, too, but they've held on pretty well.

    I am reading Dan Brown's Digital Fortress, which is more techno-thriller than fantasy but which moves at a breakneck pace that I really like. I've read Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons, by the same author, and enjoy his storytelling style. Much of it is implausible, but that is a minor consideration in fiction. I'm going to finish it in a few days, and then I'm turning to Writers of the Future #35, which is a short story anthology. I read the latest volume every year, because there are always at least a few stories I like. I've been reading WotF for ten years, and I'm looking forward to this one, as well.
     
  15. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    Just saw that the 3 volume The Dark Crystal Creation Myths comics were on kindle unlimited so I gobbled those up. Very interesting. I'd almost forgotten how cool the world of Thra was. Many years ago I read the official novelization of the movie and really enjoyed the extra detail in it. I think I'm going to have to find it again and probably all the other Dark Crystal stuff out there in anticipation of the new series coming out this summer!
     
    Steerpike likes this.
  16. I tend to have way too many books going at once but right now these three are definite finishers in the coming week or so:

    Song of the Current
    The Witches of New York
    The Night Tiger
     
  17. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Archmage

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    By happenstance I came over a rather obscure work, "The Notes of a Cavalryman" (my own translation) by Nikolay Gumilyov about his service in the Imperial Russian Army in the First World War. Its a bit of a detective work because the text was both censured by Soviet authorities when it was released and also as the author was an unapologetic conservative monarchist I suspect he's kind of whitewash the war and the Russian army's part in it. Because eveyone's always cheerful and positive and while the Germans are advancing into Russia, you get a feeliing the Russians are essentially running circles around their enemies all the time. No fear, panic, feeling of loss, hate or rage. Everyone's just jolly, brave and upstanding soldiers. I would suppose there's a reason as to why there's happy tales of brave reconnaissance of the Russian cavalry into East Prussia in 1914, but then the text kind of jumps ahead with no mention of the Battle of Tannenberg and the First Battle of the Masurian Lakes in 1914.

    And its kind of a theme. At every mentioned encounter the Russians gets the better of the Germans or the Austrians, but somehow its the brave and jolly good Russian soldiers who are retreating despite constant success. I remember a comment by a military historian writer that the greater the focus is on individual heroics by a side, the worse the war is going for them. And there are alot of individual Russian heroics in this one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  18. Mythopoet

    Mythopoet Auror

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    FINALLY finished Lamekis or The Extraordinary Adventures of an Egyptian in the Inner Earth, with the Discovery of the Island of the Sylphides by Charles de Fieux de Mouhy. This monster, published in parts from 1735-1737 is easily the most insane fantasy story I've ever read. It follows in the tradition of Lucian's A True History but is more dedicated to crafting a detailed world of nonsense. The book weaves multiple odd narratives and framing stories together in a setting including ancient Egypt, a couple of imaginary North African countries, a vast subterranean country featuring an empire of violent worm people, and a realm in the sky peopled by sylphs. Throughout de Mouhy interjects footnotes detailing absurd rituals and customs of these various places and makes references to imaginary writings about the setting by the likes of Plato, Strabo, Aristotle and many more as if this book was really a scholarly historical work being translated by the author. It really is something. Ambitious. Wildly imaginative. Pure fantasy with no limits. But honestly I'm glad I'm finished.
     
  19. Gurkhal

    Gurkhal Archmage

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    It seems I can't edit my previous post, but I'd like to add a comment.

    In despite of my earlier folly I have finally understood that the text itself was published in Russia between 1915-1916 and hence it wasn't the early Soviet authorities who censured the text but Tsarist ones, It also explains why the Russian soldiers are seemingly always successful and in a good mood. I suppose that unless you fancy a relocation to Siberia you had to write what the censors considered acceptable.
     
  20. Hir i-Chorvath

    Hir i-Chorvath Troubadour

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    In the middle of reading the Drizzt Do'Urden series and I can't read them fast enough. Also impatiently waiting for Stormlight 5 to come out, I love the series so far!
     
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